Juniper Networks JNCIA-Junos (JN0-102): Networking Fundamentals

This first course in the Juniper Networks JNCIA-Junos certification track begins teaching the knowledge needed to pass the JN0-102 exam. This course is a great fit for network engineers or IT Ops professionals looking to understand networking basics.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jan 16, 2018
Duration
1h 55m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Collision Domains and Broadcast Domains
Function of Routers and Switches
Optical Network Fundamentals
Ethernet Networks
Layer 2 Addressing, Including Address Resolution
IPv4 and IPv6 Fundamentals
Layer 3 IP Addressing, Including Subnet Masks
Subnetting and Supernetting
Decimal to Binary Conversion
Longest Match Routing
Connection-oriented vs. Connectionless Protocols
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jan 16, 2018
Duration
1h 55m
Description

Adding networking skills to any IT pro's armory is a great idea for enhancing their career. In this course, Juniper Networks JNCIA-Junos (JN0-102): Networking Fundamentals, you'll learn the foundations of how networks work and how applications use them to function. First, you'll discover how computers communicate with each other over local and wide area networks, along with the internet. Next, you'll explore examples of computers on a local area network (LAN) talking to each other and other local servers. After that, you'll learn how they communicate over a wide area network (WAN) and the internet. Finally, you'll dive into hands-on demos showing use of a Juniper switch or router running the Junos OS. By the end of this course, you'll have a solid foundational knowledge of networking to enhance your existing skill set, and be on your way to attaining the Juniper Networks JNCIA-Junos certification.

About the author
About the author

Rich Bibby is a Network Engineer with extensive experience in designing, deploying and supporting enterprise networks of varying size and scale. Areas of expertise include Campus LAN, WAN, Data Center, VPN, and Remote Access solutions from vendors including Juniper, Cisco, Arista, Checkpoint, and Pulse Secure.

More from the author
More courses by Rich Bibby
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Rich Bibby, and welcome to my course Juniper Networks Networking Fundamentals. I'm a network engineer based in Manchester in the UK. This course is for budding network engineers or IT operations professionals looking to gain a solid understanding of the basics of networking. This course is also the first in a complete series covering the Juniper Networks' JNCIA-Junos certification, providing you with the skills and knowledge required to pass the exam. Some of the major topics that we will cover include network reference models, how ethernet networks function, an explanation of network devices such as hubs, routers, and switches, and IP addressing both in version 4 and version 6 and IP subnetting. By the end of the course, you will have a solid foundational knowledge of networking to enhance your existing skillset. You will also have completed the first step towards gaining the JNCIA-Junos certification from Juniper Networks, which is one of the most sought after in the industry. You only need a basic knowledge of computers and the internet before starting this course. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn networking with the Juniper Networks Networking Fundamentals course at Pluralsight.

Function of Routers and Switches
Hello and welcome to this module, which is all about the function of switches and routers. This modules forms part of the Juniper Networks Networking Fundamentals course on the JNCIA-Junos certification track. So, let's run through what you'll learn in this module. First of all, we'll be looking at the function of switches and how these have improved performance and scalability of networks compared to the early days of networking. We'll also log on to a Juniper switch and check out its Ethernet switching table. Secondly, we'll talk about the function of routers, what they do and the role that they play in today's modern networks. Again, we'll fire up a Juniper router and have a look at its routing table. Lastly, we'll take a look at a few different types of networks so you can get a feel for where you're likely to see switches and routers in action. At the end of this module, you'll have a solid understanding of both of these types of network devices and how they differ from each other in the kind of roles that they play.

Optical Network Fundamentals
Hello and welcome to this module about the fundamentals of optical networking. This module forms part of the Juniper Networks Networking Fundamentals course on the JNCIA-Junos certification track. So let's run through what you'll learn in this module. Optical networking is a huge subject, but for the purposes of the JNCIA-Junos exam, you're not expected to have an in-depth knowledge. But it's useful to have a solid understanding of the basics. First of all, you'll learn why we need fiber optics in the first place and how this technology has become a key element of networking, in particular for wide area networks and the Internet. Then we'll look at the basics of how fiber works and the different types of fiber cables you're likely to come across in your role as a network engineer. Lastly, we'll take a look at some of the standards that have been implemented around optical networking in an effort to allow interoperability between network equipment from different vendors, in other words, the rules that ensure that equipment from the vendor switches Juniper will work with equipment from another vendor.

Ethernet Networks
Hello and welcome to this module about Ethernet networks. This module forms part of the Juniper Networks Networking Fundamentals course on the JNCIA-Junos certification track. So, let's run through what you'll learn in this module. Ethernet is a protocol that operates at layer 2 of the OSI model and has become the dominant protocol for switched local area networks. But to understand why this is the case, we need to go back to the early days of computer networks and look at the types of cables and network devices that were in use back in the day. We'll start with looking at two different network topologies known as bus and star networks. Moving on from this foundation topic, we'll discuss those early Ethernet cable types including thick and thin Ethernet cables and then on to unshielded twisted pair, or UTP, cables. Then we'll look at some of the different types of Ethernet devices and how we've progressed from the early days of repeaters and hubs onto bridges and switches. We'll also see how a modern switch can be configured for multiple, separate virtual networks, or VLANs. We'll also jump on to the console of our Juniper switch and configure a couple of VLANs so you can see this in action.

Layer 2 Addressing, Including Address Resolution
Hello and welcome to this module, which is all about layer 2 addressing, including address resolution. This module forms part of the Juniper Networks Networking Fundamentals course on the JNCIA-Junos certification track. So, let's run through what you'll learn in this module. Ethernet standards define the physical cables, connector types, and hardware that make up Ethernet networks. They also define how one machine sends a data frame to another machine on the same Ethernet segment. In this module, we'll take a look at the format of Ethernet addresses, otherwise known as media access control, or MAC addresses. You'll also learn about how machines send data frames to each other over an Ethernet segment, including how they'll resolve the MAC address of another machine and also how machines know whether or not a data frame is addressed to them.

IPv4 and IPv6 Fundamentals
Hello and welcome to this module, which is all about Internet Protocol, or IP, version 4 and version 6 fundamentals. This module forms part of the Juniper Networks Networking Fundamentals course on the JNCIA-Junos certification track. So, let's run through what you'll learn in this module. First of all, we'll talk about how network layer or layer 3 addressing works in general. Next, IP version 4 has become the dominant layer 3 protocol, and we'll look at how IPv4 addresses are structured. And then we'll talk about the IP version 6 protocol, why it was developed and what an IP version 6 address looks like. Lastly, we'll get hands on again and I'll show you how to configure both kinds of addresses on an interface of a Juniper switch.

Layer 3 IP Addressing, Including Subnet Masks
Hello and welcome to this module, which is all about layer 3 or IP addressing including subnet masks. This module forms part of the Juniper Networks Networking Fundamentals course on the JNCIA-Junos certification track. So let's run through what you'll learn in this module. Building on our knowledge of IP addressing, we'll cover subnet masks and how these are used to determine if a destination host is on the local Ethernet segment or not. Then we'll look at the different classes of IP addresses and why they are needed. After this, we'll look at the special IPv4 address types and what they're used for. These are private, broadcast, network, multicast, and loopback addresses. Lastly, we'll get hands on again, and I'll show you how to configure a subnet mask and verify some of these address types on our Juniper switch.

Subnetting and Supernetting
Hello and welcome to this module, which is all about subnetting and supernetting. This module forms part of the Juniper Networks Networking Fundamentals course on the JNCIA-Junos certification track. So, let's run through what you'll learn in this module. First of all, we'll look at how we can subdivide IP address ranges into smaller networks in a process called subnetting. Then we'll look at supernetting, which is the process of using a subnet mask to define multiple smaller subnetworks.

Decimal to Binary Conversion
Hello and welcome to this module, which is all about decimal to binary conversion. This module forms part of the Juniper Networks Networking Fundamentals course on the JNCIA-Junos certification track. So, let's run through what you'll learn in this module. Binary is another of the fundamentals of networking that network vendors love to test exam candidates on, and Juniper is no different in this respect from any other vendor. First of all, we'll talk about what binary numbering is and how it differs from decimal numbering. And we'll look at how and why binary numbers are used in computing. Then we'll look at the process of converting an IP address from its decimal format into binary. And finally, we'll reverse this and look at how to convert an IP address from its binary format back into decimal.

Longest Match Routing
Hello and welcome to this module, which is all about longest match routing. This module forms part of the Juniper Networks Networking Fundamentals course on the JNCIA-Junos certification track. So, let's run through what you'll learn in this module. First of all, we'll talk about what longest match routing is and how it is used by routers to make forwarding decisions when they have multiple routes to the same destination in their routing table. Then we'll look at how routers actually calculate the longest match. And to understand this, we'll look at how routers use the binary IP addresses and subnet masks to make the forwarding decision.

Connection-oriented vs. Connectionless Protocols
Hello and welcome to this module, which is all about connection-oriented versus connectionless protocols. This module forms part of the Juniper Networks Networking Fundamentals course on the JNCIA-Junos certification track. So, let's run through what you'll learn in this module. First of all, we take a look at the transport layer and have a recap from an earlier module where we explained what happens at this layer. The transport layer, you will recall, is layer 4 of our network reference models. Then we'll take a look at two protocols that operate at this layer, the first one being the User Datagram Protocol, or UDP. And lastly, we'll cover the Transmission Control Protocol, or TCP. You'll also learn what the key differences are between these two transport layer protocols.