Sharing and Accessing Shared Folders with Mac

This is the second course in a series of eight courses designed to help you prepare for the ACA-Mac Integration exam. In this course, you'll look at how you can share personal files and how to access them.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Sep 16, 2016
Duration
2h 59m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Getting Started
Sharing Files Quickly Using AirDrop
Using Public Folders
Personal File Sharing
Centralized File Sharing with OS X Server
Accessing Shared Files
Wrapping Up
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Sep 16, 2016
Duration
2h 59m
Description

Without file sharing you would not be able to collaborate on projects, ask for input on documents, or provide a central location where all files can exist and be backed up. In this course, Sharing and Accessing Shared Folders with Mac, you'll develop the skills to use AirDrop and public folders for quick and easy file sharing. First, you'll learn how to share files using AirDrop and how to take advantage of the public and Dropbox folders. Next, you'll learn how to configure personal file sharing. Finally, you'll learn about sharing with OS X server and how to access files on both Mac and Windows shared folders. By the end of this course, you'll be able to not only discuss the different ways you can share files and folders with others, but you'll also be able to show someone the proper way to share files with others.

About the author
About the author

Ken has over 30 years of IT experience. In his career he has worked as a NetWare Admin, Windows Admin, Senior Support Engineer, Trainer, and Consultant.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Ken Mauldin, and welcome to my course on Sharing and Accessing Shared Folders with Mac. I'm a technical trainer at Fortinet, a network security company, and an author here at Pluralsight. This course is designed to help prepare you for taking the Apple certified associate Mac integration exam, but it's also helpful for learning the different ways that we can share files and folders with others. In this course, we're going to look at how we can use different techniques to share files with other users on our network and how to access those shared folders. Some of the major topics that we will cover include sharing files with AirDrop, how to take advantage of the public and Dropbox folders, configuring personal file sharing, sharing with OS X Server, and how to access files on both Windows and Mac servers and workstations. By the end of this course, you'll be able to not only discuss the different ways you can share files and folders with others, but you will be able to also show someone the proper ways and techniques to not only share the files, but also access the files. Before beginning this course, you should be familiar with OS X Basics and how to navigate through finder and the system preferences. A basic knowledge of what permissions are and how they are used is a good recommendation, but it's not a requirement. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn file sharing with Sharing and Accessing Shared Folders with Mac course here at Pluralsight.

Getting Started
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Sharing and Accessing Shared Folders with Mac. You know there's an old saying that everything we needed to learn, we learned back in Kindergarten, and for some of us Kindergarten was a really long time ago. But one of the biggest things we did learn back in Kindergarten was how to share and how to share with others that we wanted to play with. Well, networking is not much different. When we look at networks today, the whole purpose of them, or at least the primary purpose, is to share resources with other users in our network environment and that's one of the things we want to look at in this particular course is how we can share folders and files and how we can access those shared folders that others want to allow us access to. So with that, let's get started.

Sharing Files Quickly Using AirDrop
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching sharing files quickly using AirDrop. Imagine being able to take a file and say I need to send it to a particular device. Well, that's what AirDrop allows you to do. You can very quickly and easily transfer a file from your Mac to an iOS device or from your Mac to another Mac or from your iOS device to another iOS device and if everything is enabled by default like it should, meaning that when you got your iOS device or your Mac, everything was turned on that was necessary for you to use AirDrop, there's really nothing for you to configure. Just a matter of making sure everything is turned on properly. So imagine being able to transfer files between devices with really no management and you get to pick and choose whether or not you want to accept the file that somebody's going to transfer to your device. A lot of cool things coming up in AirDrop. So with that, let's get started.

Using Public Folders
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Using Public Folders. So we mentioned that there are several different ways that we can share files with others and one of those is to use public folders. Now if I have two people who are sharing the same Mac, maybe it's a Mac Mini or an iMac and they work different shifts as an example, well, with no configuration requirements of any kind, I can log in and be able to access the public folder of the other user or users that are sharing the Mac hardware. Imagine that, no actual configuration at all. All I have to do is make sure that the files that I want to share with others are in my public folders. It's that simple. I mean imagine that being able to share files very quickly and easily with no user administration requirements on your side. But public folders are not just for local access. They can also be for network access. So that's what we want to talk about as we go through this particular module is how we can use those public folders both on the internal Mac meaning sharing the Mac with somebody else, but also how to allow others to be able to access the public folders on my Mac. So with that, let's get started.

Personal File Sharing
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Personal File Sharing. Personal file sharing in my opinion is one of the harder ones to be able to set up and configure and the reason for that is, well technically, everybody becomes an administrator. If you think about it, anybody that wants to be able to share a file or a folder with somebody else is going to have to go through the process of creating the share, assigning permissions deciding who they're going to give permissions to, and realistically where. Most of the personal file sharing folders that we're going to allow to other people, well they're typically going to be in our home folder, so that means we need to protect our home folder and come up with ideas on how to build our home folder structure better as well, to allow users access to the files we want and not allow access to files we don't want. And once again, going back to that first piece, everybody is going to be responsible for their own machine. So we got a lot to look at in this particular module, so let's get started.

Centralized File Sharing with OS X Server
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Centralized File Sharing with OS X Server. In a previous module, we talked about how each person that wants to share files with other folks that exist out there in your network, all those nice little end users that we might have is going to become a network administrator and that's not typically their job. Think about an accountant. An accountant's job is to come in and work with the finances of a company, right, not come in and say okay I need to share files with other people, so what privileges do I need to do, who do I need to assign them to, I've got to create users, I've got to create some groups, I've got to assign permissions. That takes a lot of time away from the financial aspects that they're supposed to be focusing on. So what if we took all that information, all those nice little shared folders, and centralized them in one spot out on our OS X Server. Then we could have a typical administrator out there that is responsible for all of those files and folders. Now the accountant can go back to doing what they need to do as far as the financial aspects of our company goes and the network administrator can focus on being able to take care of the network itself. So that's what we want to look at in this particular module. So what do you say we get started.

Accessing Shared Files
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Accessing Shared Files. When you think back to everything we've covered up to this point, we've looked at it from the side of the client, me being the actual workstation or server if you will and allowing people access to my particular files and folders, but how do I allow that person to actually gain the access. I mean, we've set everything up as far as the shares go, but how can I tell that person how to gain the access that they need so that they could actually use those files and folders and that's what we want to look at in this particular module is how can I can that access so that I can get authenticated, have my permissions verified, and then be able to do the things that I need to those particular files and folders. So we've got a lot coming up in this particular module, so let's go ahead and get started.

Wrapping Up
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Wrapping Up. Yes, that means we made it to the end of this particular course. There was a lot that we covered in this particular course, everything from local file sharing to centralized file sharing to accessing files on other devices that exist out there like Windows Servers, as well as other Macs and OS X environments. So let's go ahead and take a quick look back and what we talked about and then let's see what's coming up next. So with that, let's get started.