Using Photoshop and After Effects to Create Cinemagraphs

Cinemagraphs are a blend of still photos and video. This course will show you how to capture photos and video to create these works of art that dwell somewhere between photography and animation. Software required: Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe After Effects CC.
Course info
Rating
(13)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 23, 2016
Duration
1h 21m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(13)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 23, 2016
Duration
1h 21m
Description

Have you ever seen a photo unexpectedly start to move? Not a video clip, but what appears to be an authentic photograph and it magically comes to life with movement. This is a Cinemagraph. In this course, Using Photoshop and After Effects to Create Cinemagraphs, you will learn how to craft your own magically-moving, photographic wonders. First, you will learn what makes for a successful cinemagraph and how to isolate simple movement in Photoshop. Next, you will learn how to use After Effects to stabilize and loop handheld video in support of a cinemagraph. Finally, you will learn how to craft a beautiful fantasy style cinemagraph using stock images and video. When you're finished with this course, you'll not only be able to create stunning cinemagraphs, but may also be inspired to create new ways of showing your own artistic visions. Software required: Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe After Effects CC.

About the author
About the author

Kirk is a professional graphics with almost 20 years of experience, and an Adobe Certified Expert in Photoshop. His work has been published over 400 times in internationally acclaimed publications. Kirk has experience with a broad range of subjects in design. Kirk is just your friendly neighborhood Graphics Geek!

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello everybody, my name is Kirk Nelson, and welcome to my course on Using Photoshop and After Effects to Create Cinemagraphs. I'm a professional graphics artist with nearly 20 years of experience. My work has been published over 400 times in various international publications, but at heart I'm just your friendly neighborhood graphics geek. Have you ever seen a photo start to move? I don't mean a video clip, but a photograph, a picture that by all rights should be perfectly still, but somehow it isn't. It's like a little sliver of magic brought just a small portion of the image to life. That's what cinemagraphs are all about, and in this course we're going to explore several techniques on how to create different types of cinemagraphs of your very own. Some of the major topics we'll cover is what makes a cinemagraph a cinemagraph, how to isolate simple movement using Photoshop, how to use After Effects in the cinemagraph workflow, and finally, how to create a fantasy double exposure style cinemagraph project. By the end of this course, you'll know how to use Photoshop and After Effects to create your own beautiful cinemagraphs either from your own footage or with some stock resources. Before beginning this course, you should be familiar with the basic features and interface of both Adobe Photoshop CC and Adobe After Effects CC. Also, having some familiarity with working with video is additionally helpful. I hope you'll join me in this journey to learn everything you need to know about creating your very own cinemagraphs with this course, Using Photoshop and After Effects to Create Cinemagraphs, here at Pluralsight.

What is a Cinemagraph?
Hello everybody, Kirk Nelson here, and I want to welcome you to this course on Using Photoshop and After Effects to Create Cinemagraphs. This is the first module where we talk about what a cinemagraph actually is. Before we get into that, let's discuss the learning objectives of this course. First of all, we'll identify what it is that makes a cinemagraph a cinemagraph, that is what sets it apart from other types of medium. We'll explore capturing your very own video and photographs to create your own cinemagraphs. We'll talk about using Photoshop to take that video and/or photography and create a very simple cinemagraph from those files. Then we will explore a similar workflow in After Effects primarily dealing with some of the video functionality of that program. There are several things that you're going to need to know before beginning this course. Basic operation of a DSLR that is capable of shooting video. It's preferable if you already have one yourself or at least have access to one. You should know how to operate the camera on manual mode and know basically how to record video with it. You should be familiar with Photoshop's interface and basic features. We're going to be using Photoshop quite a bit in this course, and this is an intermediate level course, so I will expect you to know your way around the program. Same thing with After Effects. We'll be using some of the video features within that program to create these cinemagraphs, and it's going to be helpful if you're already familiar with it. And so to close off this clip, I want to leave you with this quote. "Animation is not the art of drawings that move. . . but the art of movements that are drawn. " This is attributed to Norman McLaren, and I leave you with this quote because cinemagraphs are very similar to animation, and we'll talk more about that in the next clip.