Play by Play: Lightning UX Design Process for Salesforce Developers

In this course, you’ll learn how a UX design process can help developers find the right approach to solve common end-user issues through team collaboration and prototyping.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Feb 6, 2019
Duration
1h 5m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Feb 6, 2019
Duration
1h 5m
Description

Play by Play is a series in which top technologists work through a problem in real time, unrehearsed, and unscripted. In this course, Play by Play: Lightning UX Design Process for Salesforce Developers, Matthew Turnure and Don Robins demonstrate how a team-oriented UX Design process can help solve common UX problems for the end-user to fit your budget and timeline. Learn the concepts of user experience and design, common UX issues, and different UI options available with various out-of-the-box Lightning Components and SLDS styles. By the end of this course, you’ll have gained a solid understanding of how to apply these practices to your development, helping you to provide a better user experience for your own users in your applications.

About the author
About the author

Matt Turnure has been developing ISV products on the Salesforce Platform since 2015. With an affinity for all things front-end since 2007, he is passionate about delivering great user experiences. Currently, Matt is a Lead Developer at CodeScience and is passionate about best practices, DevOps, and working with Agile teams.

About the author

Don Robins is a well known Salesforce MVP, instructor, author, and speaker. A custom business application developer for more decades than he cares to admit, he focuses on Salesforce technical instruction and knowledge sharing.

More from the author
More courses by Don Robins
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Welcome to this Salesforce Play by Play with Pluralsight. Salesforce Play by Play is an interactive series where we sit down with Salesforce experts, such as MVPs, consultants, developers, and architects, to discuss common challenges faced everyday by Salesforce customers. In this course we challenge Matt Turnure, front end developer and UX designer, to show how UX design processes can help developers find the right approach to solve common end user issues through team collaboration and prototyping. First, Matt demystifies the concepts of user experience and design and explains why developers must make the conscious effort of stepping into the role of designer, taking responsibility for making good design decisions for their users. Next, he takes us on an exploration of some common UX issues, reviewing implementation options and considerations. You'll watch as he hand draws screen designs and codes a prototype for multiple and single record search selection patterns, while experimenting with alternate approaches to display record data. Along the way, he digs into the Salesforce Lightning Design System, compares and contrasts UI options available with various out of the box Lightning components and SLDS styles, and then brings it all together to show how his approach leads directly to an effective user experience solution. By the time we're done, you'll have gained a solid understanding of how to apply these practices to your development, helping you to provide a better user experience for your own users in your applications. So whether you're a beginner, intermediate, or advanced Salesforce developer, please join us for Lightning UX Design Process for Salesforce for Developers. We hope you enjoy it.

Search Result UI Patterns
Okay so here's probably the funnest part, how this all ties together, and this is the search results that get presented after you've done your filtering and searching. And let's talk about a couple of patterns that you might see. We'll start with a really conventional one that most everybody's very familiar with at this point, tables, tabular data. And we already see that in list views. I think it's worth mentioning that it's a valid thing to do sometimes. And let's just look at what it might look like if our search results came out in a table. So, let me share my screen for a moment. And just, let's look at this table here that represents the different dogs that were returned from a search. Now one thing that we had a problem with earlier with the global search was that we didn't get to see a picture. Well in this pattern, there's a mechanism to where we can see a picture. And what might that look like? Let me just mention there's a couple of other things missing, primarily the description. Because the description is so large, it does not make sense to show it in this format. And that's not different than the out of the box list view where you could put a description, but it's going to throw off, it's going to skew the size of the rows in the grid. Exactly.