Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 21, 2010
Duration
1h 26m
Description

In this series of lessons, we'll learn how to use the tracking, keying, and masking nodes in NUKE to create a fast, robust rotoscope shape. By using each node for their specific strength, we'll be able to achieve production-quality results much faster than hand keying. We'll begin this project by learning the basics of using trackers to speed up the rotoscoping process by removing camera jitter, translation, rotation, and scaling. We'll then dive into our main project where we will use a combination of tracking, stabilizing, luminance keying and Bezier shape animation to create a clean mask for our foreground actor. We'll learn how each of these different methods can be used to speed up our rotoscoping workflow. Software required: NUKE 5.2v1 or higher.

About the author
About the author

Chris is a VFX author at Pluralsight. Along with creating and recording training, he also manages the support team and works closely with the production development team. He began his career working freelance and quickly realized that he wanted to find a company where he could use his talents to help people succeed in the CG industry.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
Hello, I'm Chris with Digital-Tutors. In this series of lessons, we'll learn how to use the tracking, keying, and masking nodes in Nuke to create a fast, robust rotoscope shape. While using each node for their specific strengths, we'll be able to achieve production-quality results much faster than with hand-keying. We'll begin this project by learning the basics of using trackers to speed up the rotoscoping process by removing camera jitter, translation, rotation, and scaling. We'll then dive into our main project where we will use a combination of tracking, stabilizing, luminance keying, and Bezier shape animation to create a clean mask for our foreground actor. We'll learn how each of these different methods can be used to speed up our rotoscoping workflow. This series of lessons will illustrate an example of how to combine the different masking and tracking tools together to create an animated luminance map. This will allow us to complete our rotoscoping work much faster and with a much higher degree of accuracy. So with that, let's go ahead and get started.