Salesforce Workflow: Getting Started

Every Salesforce administrator, developer, or specialist should know Workflow. This course gives a practical introduction to using Workflow, including how to enact field updates, send email alerts, send outbound messages to APIs, and create Tasks.
Course info
Rating
(12)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jan 16, 2018
Duration
1h 53m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(12)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jan 16, 2018
Duration
1h 53m
Description

Salesforce Workflow is one of the essential automation-by-clicks tools of the Salesforce platform, and any aspiring Salesforce administrator or developer will find knowing Workflow essential. This course, Salesforce Workflow: Getting Started, provides a practical introduction to Salesforce Workflow, Visual Workflow, and how to introduce automation processes in harmony alongside the efforts of other Salesforce automation. First, you'll explore Workflow at a high level and get an understanding of its uses. Next, you'll learn how to create your own Workflow rules and actions that enact field updates, send email alerts, send outbound messages to outside systems, create Task records, and produce time-dependent actions. Finally, you'll see a comparison to the Visual Workflow tool, and gain an understanding of how to begin designing your own Visual Workflows. By the end of this course, you'll have a better understanding of how Salesforce Workflow can impact your organization. Software required: A Salesforce developer org.

About the author
About the author

Scott is the director of Elega Corporation, which produces business applications and develops games. His development career was launched in the litigation support industry and has expanded to solar energy using Salesforce and its Apex programming language, Python, C#, and numerous kinds of integrated databases.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Scott Lee, and welcome to my course, Salesforce Workflow: Getting Started. I am the founder and director of Elega Corporation. I've also worked for other companies for many years as a Salesforce and software developer. Did you know that you can automatically update records in your Salesforce database without ever having to write any traditional programming language? It's possible with Workflow. In this course, we're going to enact field updates, send emails alerts, learn how to configure outbound messages, create task records, all using Workflow, and introduce Visual Workflow, another tool for point-and-click automation. By the end of this course, you'll now how to create your own workflow rules, having seen practical real-world style examples, and have a better idea of choosing the right Salesforce automation tool for a given problem. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with Salesforce objects and records. Overall, this is built with the beginner in mind. You are not required to have had any administrative or development-related experience. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn Salesforce Workflow and Visual Workflow with the Salesforce Workflow: Getting Started course, at Pluralsight.

Understanding Workflow at a High Level
Now that we generally know what's required to get started with Workflow, which is relatively little, it's time to examine Workflow at a high level. For instance, what is Workflow? What does that really mean? What can Workflow do or how can it be used? When can we just not use Workflow? If you watched the previous module's very high general overview of Workflow itself, then we have the very beginnings of some answers to this, but here we'll begin to explore deeper.

Automating Field Updates Using Rules
Welcome to this module on Automating Field Updates Using Rules. Field updates are my favorite, and I admit that's part of the reason that we are starting with them. But I think it's also true that field updates make a great template for your very first workflow rule. In the last module, we learned that all workflow rules begin with criteria. Say for example that when an opportunity goes from not having any account associated with it to then having an account associated, we want to engage a workflow action, a field update, to update the opportunity stage to needs analysis. As a means of understanding the general mechanics on how we create and then watch Workflow in action, we will be tackling this challenge first. Without much context I realize this may not mean a whole lot, but we will tackle a real-world business case shortly. The main goal first will be to understand the overall process involved in creating criteria, producing actions, and then seeing the results. Let's get hands on right now so that we can immediately start having some practical knowledge to work with.

Sending Email Alerts to Users
Email alerts are a useful option for workflow actions. For example, you may want to know when a certain dollar amount reaches a particular threshold, or when a certain kind of customer complaint comes in through the service system, or when a record enters a certain status. You might even use email alerts as a way of sending invoices to customers. In this module, we'll discuss what can be in an email alert, including things like merged fields or immediately related objects. Use cases similar to those I just described will be covered here as well. In a demo, we'll show how a sales manager can be notified as soon as an opportunity is lost. I'll show you how to create a very simple prototype email template, and then demonstrate how to set up the workflow rule.

Tasks, Custom Objects, and Users
It's time to take a different direction now that I'm assuming you've completed the first modules, introducing Workflow at a high level, performing some field updates, and sending email alerts. Now we're here to begin taking things to the next level a bit that with creating tasks, acting on some custom objects or custom fields, and acting on users. In this module, we'll explore the big picture so for, discussing how the current skills combine together to form a more comfortable process for any administrator or developer. We'll introduce task record creation actions along with some examples, time-dependent actions, and discussing when it makes sense to schedule some follow-up actions. The user object allows workflow rules, but it also has special considerations. In a demo, I'll show how to bring together some of the skills we have developed so far, showing how to create tasks based off the opportunity stage, along with how to deactivate temporary users. It's time to bring it all together.

Leveraging APIs with Outbound Messages
Outbound messages are, in my opinion, one of the more impressive attempts by Salesforce to bring configuration by clicks into another level of power. In the high-level overview module, we discussed outbound messages very briefly, but in this module we'll have a deeper explanation of API concepts to start. Understanding APIs in general can go a very long way to making the understanding of outbound messages that much easier. And, of course, we'll dig deeper into outbound messages themselves more too, the what, the how, and the why. This module's primary example will center around setting up a hypothetical tax service that will be said to exist at some outside API. To begin, let's talk about why APIs matter so much in the next clip.

Using Visual Flows with Workflow
We've now covered just about everything we can relevant to Workflow's basics. But if you've poked around the Salesforce documentation much, or the Salesforce Setup menu, you might've noticed an option for simply flows. Flows are sometimes also referred to as Visual Flows or Visual Workflow. We're going to take a step beyond simple Workflow in this module. We'll discuss Visual Flow versus Workflow. I'll introduce you to the Cloud Flow Designer, which is used to create Visual Flows. As you can guess, Globomantics' shoe madness is still there and will have some problems to solve with our complex tool this time too. In this module's demo, we'll uncover how to apply a specific discount to an opportunity in a more branching logic structure. Let's get started.

Conclusion and Considerations
Hopefully by the time you're watching this final module, you've made it through the entire course and obtained every last piece of knowledge you can possibly get out of it. It has been my pleasure putting together this material for you and I hope you've gotten serious value out of it. In this module, we'll discuss some of the key takeaways that we have gotten through the course, at least speaking in terms of high-level takeaways. In details, I'm hoping you've used this as a basis for developing your skills in a way they just weren't there before. We'll also discuss Workflow in the larger context of the Salesforce Platform, the importance of collaboration with other developers and team members, and other considerations you may need going forward. Remember, Workflow is development, and you're a part of the development world. Perhaps most importantly in the broader context, I'll give you some areas to explore next. The Salesforce Platform is a vast area where you can build the new skills, and Workflow itself is only a single tool among many to consider.