The Anatomy of an Expression for Facial Animation in Maya

In this Maya tutorial, we cover the firing of muscles in the face in response to thought in the brain. Software required: Maya 2012.
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Jun 24, 2013
Duration
2h 25m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Jun 24, 2013
Duration
2h 25m
Description

In this Maya tutorial, we cover the firing of muscles in the face in response to thought in the brain. The face is a complex machine that, when operating correctly, can bring a great deal of emotion and entertainment to our audience. To create good facial animations, it is critical to understand the system under the surface that creates expression. We'll dive deep into the muscle system of the face as well as cover a number of good tips for making dynamic and interesting expressions. Software required: Maya 2012.

About the author
About the author

Andrew Conroy is the Lead Animation Faculty for the Art Institute of Salt Lake City. He has spent time in the games, animation and VFX industry.

More from the author
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
(invigorating music) Alright, in this lesson we are going to cover in great detail the muscles of the face and how they interact with one another. So we're going to start out really just talking about big muscles, small muscle groups, and then into hard, bony areas of the face as well as fatty pockets of the face, like the cheeks. We're going to talk about how each one of those interacts with one another, but before we get into that we need to talk about which one of these, which muscle groups in the face are the driving muscles and which are the responding muscles. And really I'm going to do my best here to give you a great, great look into how the face moves together, how shapes in the face move together and how we can get these characters really to look alive and really trick our audience into believing this character and this pile of data has life. We're going to talk about that, and in the end you'll have a nice little piece of animation and a really good understanding on what's actually happening as expressions come to the face.