VMware Horizon View 6.0 New Features

This course covers the new features in VMware's Horizon View 6.0.
Course info
Rating
(42)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 9, 2015
Duration
4h 8m
Table of contents
What Are VDI and Horizon View?
Upgrading from 5.x
Server Hosted Desktops
VSAN
Integration with Horizon Workspace
View Agent Direct Connect
Mobile Device Access
Logging and Supported Microsoft Versions
Horizon View 6.1
Horizon View Certificates
Description
Course info
Rating
(42)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 9, 2015
Duration
4h 8m
Description

This course covers the new features in VMware's Horizon View 6.0. Engineers working with View 5.x need to understand View 6.0 before they upgrade their environments or deploy View 6.0. Check back soon for updates on 6.1.

About the author
About the author

Alastair has worked in IT Infrastructure for too long, through the rise of Windows and now Virtualization. He is deeply involved in the community around virtualization and lives in New Zealand.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

What Are VDI and Horizon View?
Welcome to this Pluralsight training course on the new features of VMware's Horizon View version six. I'm Alastair Cooke, and I'll be leading you through this training course. You can find me on Twitter as @DemitasseNZ and you can find my blog at www. demitasse. nz. We're going to start by having a look at what VDI is and what Horizon View as a product is. We'll have a look at the process of upgrading an existing Views 5 environment up to View version six. We'll have a look at the better support for remote desktop session hosts that we have in the View 6 and for me, this is one of the best new features in View 6. We'll also look at VMware's VSAN, their storage product. See how that can be used with Horizon View and how it can help with some of our scaling challenges. We'll look at the integration between the Horizon workspace portal and Horizon View as a way of delivering our applications to our own users. We'll also have a look at the view agent direct connect functionality that has grown through version five and is there in version six as well. In a mobile first-world it's important that we understand how mobile device access for Horizon View works, so we'll spend some time looking at that. We'll finish off by looking at the changes to logging and the supported versions of Microsoft software that are brought with version six.

Server Hosted Desktops
Welcome back to this Pluralsight course on the new features of VMware's Horizon View Version Six. I'm Alastair Cooke and in this module we're going to have a look at the server-hosted desktops, first module that looks at the new features in VM. So, first off what is Remote Desktop Session Host, the basis for our server-hosted desktops? So, where we use one Windows server to deliver multiple desktops, and therefore multiple users. When it was brand new it was called Terminal Services, and so sometimes I will refer to it as Terminal Services because I've been working with it since way back with Windows NT Four back in the last millennium. It is a role that can be installed on a Windows server, so it is a standard Microsoft role that can be added to any server, and allows that server to provide desktops for multiple users.

VSAN
Welcome to the VSAN module of this Pluralsight training course on the new features of Horizon View Six. I'm Alistair Cooke and we're getting towards halfway through this training course. VSAN is VMWare's policy-driven storage product, and its aim is to make storage provisioning and management very easy in a vSphere environment. The kind of things that I see as the primary traits in VSAN are that it uses local storage inside your ESXi servers to store virtual machines. Now, we typically don't use the local storage because it's stuck inside one ESXi server. We can't move virtual machines around. And if that ESXi server goes down, we've lost access to the virtual machines. So VSAN takes that local storage and turns it into a redundant shared storage. Then we don't have that dependence on a specific ESXi server. We pull together storage in the ESXi servers, and we make it available even if individually an ESXi server is not available. An important characteristic for VSAN is the use of policy. Policy-based storage management has been a focus for VMWare for the last few years. And VSAN is really their flagship for that policy-based management.

Mobile Device Access
This is Pluralsight training course on the new features of Horizon View Version Six. I'm Alistair Cooke and we're heading into the second to last module Mobile Device Access. When we think about mobile device access it's certainly been an area of expansion over the few years. There are a lot more mobile devices around. So, we've always had mobile Windows devices, we've had laptops. Macs, seems that everywhere you go there are more Macs springing up. People are choosing to bring their own Macs. And, of course, along with them iOS devices both iPads and iPhones. Increasing numbers of Android devices and again lots of Android phones but also increasing numbers of tablets around. Funnily enough, there's the odd mobile Linux device, in fact, Android's a Linux box anyway. And, there is, of course, the access from an HTML5 Browser as being kind of universal access. I'm going to start by looking at that universal access and get onto the more mobile devices later.

Horizon View 6.1
This module covers the new features in Horizon View 6. 1 that VMware released in March of 2015. It's an additional module on the Horizon View 6. 0 New Features Course from Pluralsight. One of the things we'll look at is the changes to hardware-accelerated 3D graphics that were added in 6. 1. We'll look at support for 2012 R2 desktops, some additions to the features with Remote Desktop Session Host. We'll also look at additions to support changes to storage in vSphere version 6, as well as the retirement of some Windows operating systems. There's some new features in networking, and there's also some experimental features to have a play with in non-production environments.

Horizon View Certificates
In this module, I wanted to have a look at the use of certificates with View. Throughout the rest of the course, I've been using the self signed certificates that are installed by default, when View's installed and that's really not a good idea in production software. We'll look at how to, actually, put properly signed certificates in. We'll start with the basics of what certificates are. And if you're very familiar with certificates and PKI, then you might want to skip this clip. Then we'll look at the various places that view user certificates, particularly on the security server and connection servers, but also with View Composer. We'll finish by having a look at the impact of using load balancers and where to place certificates, with those load balancers. The problem we're trying to fix is this red stuff that we see in the admin screens. Well the View version 5. 2 and onwards, I think that was about where it changed, the self signed certificates, that View installs for itself, show up now as a red status on the connection and security servers. Even though they've always been there, they now show as an error, because they really are a bad idea. You can see that a self signed certificate is installed and that we really should have installed a certificate that is signed by a proper PKI. As a result of the self signed certificates, all of the View client connections have this big red mark through the https, and you actually have to tell the View client to allow these untrusted certificates. It would be much simpler if we had trusted certificates and the View client could just accept them, because it knew that the certificates were correct.