VMware vSphere Optimize & Scale: Monitoring & Automation

Part 3 of 3 in the VMware vSphere Optimize and Scale series focuses on monitoring and automation.
Course info
Rating
(50)
Level
Advanced
Updated
Jun 4, 2013
Duration
4h 38m
Table of contents
Monitoring and Troubleshooting Host and VM Performance
Monitoring and Troubleshooting Networking
Monitoring and Troubleshooting Storage
Monitoring and Troubleshooting vCenter Server and vSphere Hosts
Securing Your ESXi Hosts
Automation Using PowerCLI
Using the vSphere Management Assistant (vMA)
Custom ESXi Installations
Using Auto Deploy for ESXi Deployment
Next Steps
Description
Course info
Rating
(50)
Level
Advanced
Updated
Jun 4, 2013
Duration
4h 38m
Description

Part 3 of 3 in the VMware vSphere Optimize and Scale (VCAP-DCA) series focuses on monitoring and automation. VMware vExpert Jason Nash will teach you advanced skills for configuring and maintaining your own highly available and scalable virtual infrastructure. After completing this course, you'll also be prepared for the VCAP5-DCA exam. Learn how to optimize the performance of all vSphere components, manage changes to the vSphere environment, deploy DRS clusters and so much more.

About the author
About the author

Jason Nash has over 15 years of industry experience and is currently the Data Center Solutions Principal at Varrow, a leader in virtualization, storage, and DR located in the southeast.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Automation Using PowerCLI
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Automation Using PowerCLI. So first of all, a word of caution, PowerCLI is really cool, it's also very powerful, but it can get complex, and that can be a problem on an exam like this. So, it's a deep topic, and it really goes further than what I expect you to see on the exam. On the exam, I don't expect you to have to sit down and write out a PowerCLI script, I don't expect you to have to be a PowerCLI expert, but I would expect you to be able to at least kind of look at a script and understand what it does and see if there's an error in the script when you run it, which is fairly obvious because it throws a big red error up in font of you. But I want you to be able to understand those fundamentals. If you want to learn more about PowerCLI, I highly recommend Hal Rottenberg's course. He has a vSphere PowerCLI training at TrainSignal, and I sat through this course a while back. It was my introduction to PowerCLI. I'm not an expert in PowerCLI by any stretch, but I didn't really have any issue with PowerCLI questions on the exam. Like I said, I don't really sit down and write these scripts all the time, but I can understand them and muddle my way through them. And if you've never touched PowerCLI, that's kind of what I hope for you to be able to do after this lesson. But, again, this is one single kind of short mixed lesson against an entire course that Hal has done. So if you're a full-on vSphere administrator, and you really want to learn how to script and automate, go sit through Hal's course, you'll be really, really glad you did.

Using the vSphere Management Assistant (vMA)
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Using the vSphere Management Assistant. So what is the Management Assistant, or vMA, as we call it? Well, it's basically a virtual appliance. It runs SUSE Linux, so you don't have to worry about having a Windows license, and thanks to the agreement between VMware and SUSE, or I guess Novell, you don't have to have a SUSE Linux license either. So it's a free download, free install, nothing to worry about. And it has the virtual CLI and the vSphere SDK for PERL installed. And this allows you to basically be able to execute or run scripts and commands against remote hosts, therefore you don't have to SSH into each host and do something. Really handy if you want to do something across hosts. So with the vMA you can log into it, and then connect to this server and do something, connect to that server and do something, without actually logging out and back in, logging out and back in. It just makes it a lot more efficient. It can be done without having to authenticate each time. The idea here is if I'm doing a scripted run of something or if I'm just checking some settings on host or manually applying some changes, I don't want to have to re-log in as root or whatever on each vSphere host, so there are ways that we can do that so you don't have to authenticate each time. And you don't have to install it in the cluster, you are managing. You may have it on your notebook. You don't even have to actually run it under vSphere. You can run it under Fusion like I do on a Mac or workstation for Windows or whatever, and then connect to other hosts and manage those. You can have a single install in your environment with five different VMware clusters and connect to those individually too. So you don't have to have one for each, you can just have a central kind of location for the vMA.