VMware Workstation 9 for the IT Admin

Learn the inner workings of VMware Workstation, including configuring virtual machines, access VMs remotely, and how to download and deploy VMs.
Course info
Rating
(85)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 3, 2013
Duration
4h 16m
Table of contents
Introduction to VMware Workstation for the IT Admin
VMware Workstation Overview
Installing VMware Workstation
What's New in Workstation 9?
Creating Virtual Machines in Workstation
Navigating and Using VMware Workstation
Sharing Files Between Host and Virtual Machines
Advanced Virtual Machine Configurations
Accessing Virtual Machines Remotely with RDP, VNC, and WSX
Managing vSphere and Deploying VMs with Workstation
Downloading and Deploying Virtual Appliances
Administering VMware Workstation from the Command Line
Creating a Windows Active Directory Virtual Lab Using Workstation
Converting Virtual Machines from Hyper-V to Workstation
Comparing VMware Workstation to Other Solutions
Should I Use Workstation or vSphere?
Description
Course info
Rating
(85)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 3, 2013
Duration
4h 16m
Description

This course will show you the inner workings of VMware Workstation. You'll learn to navigate the interface, configure virtual machines, access VMs remotely, and you'll learn to download and deploy virtual appliances. This course is intended for IT administrators who want to become more familiar with VMware Workstation.

About the author
About the author

David has authored over 50 courses for Pluralsight.com around enterprise data center technologies such as cloud computing, virtualization, and (especially) VMware vSphere.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Creating Virtual Machines in Workstation
Hello, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Creating Virtual Machines in Workstation. We'll start this lesson off by talking about the three different ways to create new virtual machines in VMware Workstation. You might think there's just one way, it's to go in and click Create and install an operating system, but there's actually a couple more. Here they are. They first way is to download and then import a virtual machine, let's say, from the VMware Virtual Appliance Marketplace. Or you could actually receive a virtual machine, let's say, from a friend or a coworker. I've got a lesson in this course specifically on downloading virtual appliances from the VMware Solutions Exchange, as they now call it, so you'll learn how to do that in another lesson. The second way is to convert a virtual machine from a physical server. So it could be, let's say, your existing desktop computer, or even a server that you've got in the datacenter if you want to convert that into a virtual machine to do testing on it, or maybe development inside VMware Workstation. You can do that using the built-in VMware converter functionality. The third way is to create a brand-new virtual machine from scratch. You're creating the virtual machine container, and then you're installing the guest operating system, just like you would on a physical server. However, VMware Workstation what they call an easy install, which can actually speed up the process of, let's say, configuring a default user, entering the Windows license code, and the other common questions that you answer when you install a new Windows operating system. And, in fact, that third way of creating a new virtual machine from scratch, is what I'll show you step by step how to do in this lesson.

Managing vSphere and Deploying VMs with Workstation
Hello and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Managing vSphere and Deploying VMs with Workstation. Why would you want to manage VMware vSphere from Workstation? Well, I should first point out that this is not full vSphere management. This doesn't replace VMware vCenter. VMware vCenter is your centralized management tool for VMware vSphere hosts in the datacenter. Those are datacenter solutions. VMware Workstation, on the other hand, can give you some basic information about those virtual machines that are running in the datacenter. So you can power them off, power them on, create a new virtual machine, and you can move a virtual machine from your Workstation instance up to vSphere in the datacenter, and then even move one of those virtual machines from vSphere down to VMware Workstation. So, Workstation runs great on your desktop or laptop, VMware vSphere runs great in the datacenter. Each does what it's designed to do for its particular application. But it's so wonderful now that they can actually share virtual machines back and forth. This is something I've actually been waiting for a long time, because previously it was quite difficult to actually get a virtual machine into the datacenter. You had to power it off and then use like SCP to transfer it up to the datacenter, you might have some problems with compatibility, then you'd have to use a vSphere client to bring it into vSphere and then control it from there, so now you can do all of this from within VMware Workstation 9. Let me show you how.

Administering VMware Workstation from the Command Line
Hello, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Administering VMware Workstation from the Command Line. The first question I want to answer in this lesson is why should you administer Workstation from the command-line interface at all? I mean, it's got a great graphical interface, and to be candid with you, I'm sure you'll spend 99% of your time in the graphical interface. As an IT administrator and someone who's going to push the limits of their software, knowing how to do things from the command-line is going to be important. You may need to automate Workstation functions with scripts. Perhaps there's some common tasks that you do every day, like powering on a particular virtual machine and you want to be able to do it very quickly from a shortcut on the desktop. Maybe you're a salesman, you walk in and you don't run your virtual machines all the time, but you want to be able to just double-click an icon on the desktop and power up a couple virtual machines for demonstration purposes. There's a lot of different reason that you may need to administer Workstation from the command-line interface. So how do you do it?

Creating a Windows Active Directory Virtual Lab Using Workstation
Hello, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Creating a Windows Active Directory Virtual Lab Using Workstation. There's a number of different scenarios as to why you would want to create a Windows Active Directory virtual lab inside VMware Workstation. Perhaps you want to test upgrades to your Windows domain controllers, or servers that are connected to your Windows Active Directory. Perhaps you want to test configuration changes, or imports into the Active Directory or schema changes. Perhaps you need training in Windows Active Directory or Windows Server, maybe you're sitting for a Microsoft certification, so you need your own Windows Active Directory virtual infrastructure. Maybe you're trying to use that training to get certified with a Microsoft certification. You may be wanting to do disaster recovery testing by using a virtual lab to test what it would be like to take virtual machines from your virtual infrastructure and move them into a desktop or a laptop computer and see how they react. Are they bootable? Can they communicate with one another? Can you get the files back that you would need if a disaster had just occurred, and the company needed to conduct business. And that brings me to another scenario. Perhaps you need to test file recovery from virtual machine backups. There's an unlimited number of different scenarios where you would need Windows Servers, most likely running Active Directory, inside a virtual environment. As a datacenter administrator and IP professional, there's an unlimited number of different scenarios as to why you would need Windows Servers inside a virtual lab environment on your own local desktop or laptop computer, and I'm about to show you how to do it. And I know I entitled this lesson Windows Active Directory virtual lab, but keep in mind you don't actually have to run Windows Active Directory. Really I'm just talking about Windows servers in general, and I'll touch on the requirements for Windows Active Directory.

Comparing VMware Workstation to Other Solutions
Hello, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Comparing VMware Workstation to Other Solutions. One of the most common questions I get from people when I talk to them about VMware Workstation is, well, why shouldn't I use another solution, like why don't I use Fusion or VirtualBox or Parallels or VMware vSphere? So, in this lesson, I just wanted to quickly compare some of these different solutions to help you to be better educated about why one solution is better for a particular task over another.