Windows 8 Configuring (70-687) Part 4: Additional Configuration

Part 4 of 4 in the Windows 8 Configuring (70-687) series focuses on additional configuration of Windows 8. This series offers an in-depth look at configuring Windows 8, focusing on the topics covered by the Microsoft 70-687 certification exam.
Course info
Rating
(40)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 1, 2013
Duration
4h 6m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(40)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 1, 2013
Duration
4h 6m
Description

Part 4 of 4 in the Windows 8 Configuring (70-687) series focuses on additional configuration of Windows 8. This series offers an in-depth look at configuring Windows 8, focusing on the topics covered by the Microsoft 70-687 certification exam. Students will learn how to install Windows 8, connect to any type of network, share and secure resources, and keep PCs running quickly and reliably. Whenever possible, the instructor teaches using real-world scenarios that simulate the tasks administrators must perform while on the job. Students only need a basic understanding of how to use Windows.

About the author
About the author

Award-winning author and video instructor Tony Northrup (MCITP, MCPD, MCSE, MCTS, CISSP) has published more than 30 books covering Windows, networking, and Microsoft certification.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Configure and Manage Updates
Hi, this is Tony Northrup for TrainSignal, and in this video lesson, we're going to learn how to configure and manage updates in Windows 8. This is for the Microsoft 70-687 certification exam, and this objective has five different sub-objectives. The first is to configure update settings, so we'll show you how to configure Windows 8 updates for a local computer. The second is to configure Windows update policies, and policies like group policy settings can be used to configure Windows update on all the computers throughout your whole organization. The third sub-objective is to manage the update history. Basically, it let you look at the updates that have already been installed. And as the fourth sub-objective indicates, it allows you to uninstall updates. The last sub-objective, update Windows store applications, simply covers how to update apps. We've covered this in other lessons so I won't bother going into any detail here.

Manage Local Storage
Hi, I'm Tony Northrup for Trainsignal, and in this video lesson, we're going to learn how to manage local storage on PCs running Windows 8. This is for the Microsoft certification exam 70-687, which covers configuring Windows 8. This particular objective has three sub-objectives, manage disk volumes. Volumes are logical layer on top of the physical hard disk that you put into computers, and any one physical disk usually just has one volume, but sometimes you can have multiple volumes on a disk. So we're going to learn how to manage those. It's pretty easy. Up next we'll learn how to manage file system fragmentation, and this doesn't at all belong on this exam. In fact, a Windows operating system hasn't required you to do anything with this file system fragmentation since, I think, Windows XP. It's been automated since Windows Vista on, and you don't have to worry about it. You don't ever have to do anything, not in enterprise environments, not in your own personal computer, and not in small businesses. I will show you what file system fragmentation is though and show you the one tool that you can use to manage it, but in the real world, you don't ever need to touch it. And the last sub-objective is to manage Storage Spaces. Storage Spaces are a feature that's new to Window 8, and it's one of my favorite features of Windows 8. It's really cool because you can take all your old hard drives of varying sizes and plug them into your PC and get some actual use out of them. It will combine them logically into one volume that you can just save files on and not worry about which of many different physical disks it's going to. It even provides for redundancy. In case one of your drives fails, you won't lose your data.

Configuring Event Viewer
Hi, I'm Tony Northrop for TrainSignal and in this video lesson, we're going to learn to configure Event Viewer in Windows 8. This maps to the first two sub objectives in objective 6. 3 for the Microsoft 70-687 certification exam. In this particular lesson, we're covering how to configure and analyze the event logs and how to configure event subscriptions, event subscriptions allow you to forward events from one computer to another, and they basically allow you to centrally manage the events in your organization.

Configure Backups
Hi, I'm Tony Northrup for TrainSignal, and in this video lesson, we're going to learn how to configure backups in Windows 8. This lesson maps to Objective 7. 1 of the Microsoft Certification exam 70-687, Configuring Windows 8. It has three sub-objectives. Create a system recovery disk, which is something you can put into the computer to allow you to restore a backup when Windows won't start. The second objective is back up files, folders, and full system, which is about the most important thing you can do if you have critical data and you're not storing it in the cloud or something. And, finally, the third sub-objective is to schedule backups. Backups, you can run them manually, of course, but nobody ever remembers to do that, so it's really important to schedule them to happen automatically. This is going to be a pretty quick lesson.

Configure System Recovery Options
Hi, this is Tony Northrup for TrainSignal. In this video lesson we're going to cover how to configure system recovery options for Windows 8. This lesson maps to Objective 7. 2 of the Microsoft 70-687 Certification Exam. This particular objective has six different sub-objectives. The first is to Configure System Restore, which is pretty simple. The next is to Determine When to Choose Last Known Good Configuration. This is a bit of an oddball, because Windows 8 doesn't have last known good configuration enabled. This is something that was really commonly used in earlier versions of Windows, but one of the big changes for Windows 8 is it kind of gets rid of that. It replaces the whole entire startup process. So I don't feel like this belongs on the exam. I think it's there by mistake, but I am going to show you how to get last known good configuration turned on in Windows 8, and we'll talk about what it would do, if nothing else for historical reasons. The third sub-objective is to Perform a Complete Restore. We've covered that in another lesson, so we won't go through that entire process here. The next sub-objective is to Perform a Driver Rollback. We covered this in another lesson that covered driver configuration, so we won't repeat that here. The next sub-objective, Perform a Push Button Refresh or Reset. We will show you exactly how to do both of those things. They basically just get your computer back into an original and working state, and it's a great way to recover from malware infections. The last sub-objective is to Configure Startup Settings. This is all new with Windows 8, and it's pretty cool. So I'll show you everything you need to know about that.

Configure File Recovery Options
Hi, this is Tony Northrup for TrainSignal. And in this video lesson, we're going to learn how to configure file recovery options in Windows 8. This lesson is for the Microsoft 70-687 certification exam specifically, objective 7. 3. This objective has three sub-objectives and they're all really really easy. Configure file restore points. A file restore point, well, it doesn't really exist. This isn't a thing. The only reference I can find for the phrase file restore point is in this particular sort of occasion exam objectives. So, here's what happens. They, Microsoft comes up with these terms during the development of Windows. And then sometimes in the last minute, they change them to mean something else. They simply decide, oh we don't want to use the term file restore points, so we will want to call it file history, which is what it eventually became. Now, the poor guys who write these certification exams, they're developing the objectives for the exam while Windows 8 is in development. So, clearly they created this objective when the feature was called a file restore point. Microsoft went on to change the name to file history. But the exam objectives could not legally be updated. So, the exam objective is still calling it a file restore point. Anyway, I'm really, I'm just guessing that they mean file history, because file restore points don't actually exist, but I will show you more about file history that we've covered in other lessons. They also want you to know how to restore previous versions of files and folders, which is functionality implemented in file history. And finally they want you to configure file history. I don't know why they call it file history here and file restore points, like I said. There's system restore and file history but I don't know what file restore points are.