Windows 8 Managing and Maintaining (70-688) Part 2

Part 2 of 4 in the Windows 8 Managing and Maintaining (70-688) series. This course covers all the essential information needed to understand and operate Microsoft Windows 8.
Course info
Rating
(34)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 28, 2013
Duration
4h 6m
Table of contents
Internet Explorer 10
Hardware Issues
Printing
BranchCache
Keeping Data Safe and Secure
Networking
VPNs and DirectAccess
Description
Course info
Rating
(34)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 28, 2013
Duration
4h 6m
Description

Part 2 of 4 in the Windows 8 Managing and Maintaining (70-688) series. This course covers all the essential information needed to understand and operate Microsoft Windows 8. In addition to covering all objectives of the 70-688 exam, this course covers basics such as installing Windows 8, the new Search Charm, and Live Tiles, to advanced features such as Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack, BitLocker, and Storage Spaces. Aside from a strong background in IT, no pre-requisite knowledge or experience is required. Whether it's passing the 70-688 exam or implementing Windows 8 into your organization, this is the course for you.

About the author
About the author

During his 20+ years in the IT industry, John has enjoyed the opportunity to work as a consultant, architect, executive, speaker, and author.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Internet Explorer 10
Hello there. This is John O'Neill Sr. with TrainSignal, and I'm happy you've returned for some more great Windows 8 training. Today, we are going to take a look at Internet Explorer 10, which is the browser that's included with Windows 8, so let's get to it. The first thing to know about Internet Explorer 10 in Windows 8 is that there are actually 2 different versions of the product included. There are two very unique browsing experiences. Internet Explorer is what we call the browser that's in the native UI side and what used to be known as the metro interface and it's a very touch centric immersive browser. It's developed from the ground up for the new Windows 8 user interface. It is pretty much Chromeless, meaning that there's not a whole lot of menus or borders taking up space. Edge to edge is your web experience. Other than that, we have Internet Explorer for the Desktop, which is the traditional tab layout style browser that you're used to and it runs over on that conventional desktop in Windows 8. Put the two together and they are known as Internet Explorer 10, and this is important to know for the test. Internet Explorer 10 is what they refer to as both browsers. Internet Explorer for the Desktop is IE 10 on the desktop and Internet Explorer is IE10 over in the native UI. I know it sounds confusing, but it's what they call it and it's an important consideration to know for the test.

Hardware Issues
Okay, team. This lesson's an important one. I know they're all important, but this one's going to deal with something that occurs over and over in IT, those pesky hardware issues. We're going to take a deep dive into looking at drivers, as well as testing out different hardware on the computer, and even using the built-in Windows 8 hardware troubleshooters. Let's not waste any more time and let's get to it.

BranchCache
Hello there. This is John O'Neill Sr. with TrainSignal, and in this lesson, we are going to take a look at BranchCache and BranchCache is a feature that has been enhanced in Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 so that organizations can optimize how clients in remote offices, or locations across a WAN connection, or even clients accessing resources from the cloud can optimize the file transfer times or the content transfer times to be more accurate. So without any further ado, let's get to it.

VPNs and DirectAccess
Hello. This is John O'Neill Sr. , and in today's lesson, we are going to be taking a look at VPNs and DirectAccess and how they're used in Windows 8. Well you ready? Then let's get to it. A VPN, or Virtual Private Network, is a technology that allows remote users to securely connect to corporate or organizational resources. So it answers the question of how can a user that's out on the road in a hotel access a file share that's back at corporate headquarters without compromising any form of security. Well VPN is the technology to have. It literally extends the office network to wherever the user is. So I just gave an example of a user at a hotel, but they could be a passenger in a car going down the freeway using a cellular connection to get on the internet and then establish a VPN into the organization's headquarters. Wherever they are, VPNs allow the office and them to come together. You might have caught that I mentioned you can use a VPN or you typically do use a VPN across the internet. Well internet connections tend to be quite cheap, at least compared to dedicated circuits that go from remote locations back into corporate headquarters.