Windows Operating System Fundamentals: Install and Configure

This course is designed to start the foundation with Microsoft Windows desktop operating system by learning solid skills to build your IT future upon.
Course info
Rating
(94)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Nov 11, 2013
Duration
7h 11m
Table of contents
Introduction to Windows
Windows 7 Installation
Upgrading to Windows 7
Configuring Windows Desktop
Additional Configuration
Managing Devices
Installing and Configuring Print Devices
Managing Windows Services
Native Applications and Tools
Managing Applications
Virtual PC and Windows XP Mode
Description
Course info
Rating
(94)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Nov 11, 2013
Duration
7h 11m
Description

More and more computers have become a part of our everyday life. We use them at work, home, and school. Most home and businesses use Microsoft Operating Systems as their primary operating system for both workstations and servers. It is important to have a basic foundation of how to install, upgrade, and configure Windows whether you are new to the IT field or just looking to learn the basics for your home computer. This course is designed to start the foundation with Microsoft Windows desktop operating system by learning solid skills to build your IT future upon.

About the author
About the author

Ken has over 30 years of IT experience. In his career he has worked as a NetWare Admin, Windows Admin, Senior Support Engineer, Trainer, and Consultant.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction to Windows
Hello and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching an Introduction to Windows. Windows is by far the most common operating system that we have in the world today. Then there are two actual versions that we need to be aware of. There's one version that's a server version, and that server version is designed to provide resources and services to our clients. And that's actually our second operating system, the second version that we have is a client version. Client version is by far the most common we're going to run across because it's on the majority of our computers, on our desktops, our laptops, even tablets and phones today. As we go through this first module, we're going to take a look at both what a server is, as well as what a workstation is, or a client operating system. As we go through the client operating systems, we're going to take a look at some of the different editions of Windows that are available to us, and what some of the features are in each of those editions. So with that, let's get started.

Windows 7 Installation
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Windows 7 Installation. When it comes to installing Windows 7, there's a lot of different scenarios as to why. Why would we install Windows 7? And of course, it could be everything from a hard disk's failure, maybe we needed a larger hard drive. We could be building a brand new computer, or maybe it's just simply we're setting up a test lab and we need different versions of Windows 7. Maybe it's a different edition that we want to be able to try. But, like I say, there's a, could be a lot of reasons why we want to install Windows 7 fresh, but this section, we want to cover some of the basics. So, what are the minimum hardware requirements that we have to have in order for us to be able to do a successful Windows 7 installation? There's a product key that's going to be required. There are even different types of installations that we can do, everything from a light touch to a zero touch. I mean, imagine being able to do an install without any user interaction of any kind. There's ways that we can do that with Windows 7. So with that, let's get started.

Upgrading to Windows 7
Hello and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Upgrading to Windows 7. So you have a computer and that computer has an existing operating system on it. And you want to be able to upgrade that operating system to Windows 7. You want all of it, the neat new features that Windows 7 has. Well, there are a few things that we need to know in order for the upgrade process to actually work. In fact, there are some versions of the operating system though, that I cannot do at direct upgrade. I have to do actually what's called a migration. And, a migration really is an upgrade. Because it allows us to be able to save all of our files. So as we step through this lesson, we're going to not only look at upgrading, but also migration. And we're going to look at some of the utilities, that we can use as a way to find out, will my system upgrade successfully with a minimal amount of issues? So, with that, let's go ahead and get started.

Configuring Windows Desktop
Hello and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching configuring Windows Desktop. So, we've either gone through our upgrade or we did a fresh clean install of Windows 7. Now, it comes time to actually configuring the desktop. And the great thing about configuring the desktop, is that it allows us to be able to put some of our personality, some of who we are, into our desktop that we look at every day. So some of these settings could be themes where we can actually have different backgrounds and different sounds. They could be gadgets that we have where we can keep track of the weather or the, the time of the day. Maybe it's using some of the Aero features that are built in where we can actually pin an application to our taskbar, we can use a jump list, or we can use live thumbnails to make sure we're going to select the right application or see what applications we have currently running on our system. Some really cool features that we can do here with the Windows desktop. So with that, let's get started.

Additional Configuration
Hello and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Additional Windows Configuration. So we talked about how we could manage the desktop, how we could change themes, add gadgets, and those are all great configuration settings that we can do. But there are other configuration settings that we need to know about. In fact, we need to know what's inside what's called Control Panel. Control Panel is another one of our management consoles, that we're going to be able to use to manage sound cards and keyboards and mice and all kinds of different configuration settings. In addition to that, did you ever wonder where all those configuration settings are stored? Well, that's where the Windows Registry comes in. The Windows Registry is a centralized location, where all of our settings for our hardware and our software and the services and everything built into Windows is going to be stored. We also have what are referred to as policy settings. Policy settings are settings that we can apply to a computer and if somebody ever makes a change, when they reboot, those settings go right back to where they were configured originally. So some really cool features that we can look at, as far as configuring our Windows environment. So with that, let's get started.

Managing Devices
Hello and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Managing Devices. Now, devices are something that we don't typically think about, but they're extremely important. In fact, everything in our computer is a device. Keyboards, mice, speakers, sound cards, hard drives, processors, memories, those are all devices. And if we don't set the devices up properly, they're just simply not going to work. Now, there's a little piece of software called a device driver. That's the big component. That's what allows the operating system to interact with devices. So in this lesson, we're going to take a look at what some of the devices are, how we can manage devices using the software components, and how to update device drivers when they come out. So with that, let's get started.

Installing and Configuring Print Devices
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Installing and Configuring a Print Device. In a previous lesson, we talked about how devices were actually hardware components, so a print device is the big, physical, ugly thing that sits on your desk somewhere and spits out paper. And of course, that paper's going to have printed pictures on it or letters or, but you get the idea here, right? When it comes to installing and configuring a print device, we actually can have a local print device, meaning it's directly connected to your computer. We can have a network print device so we can connect to it through the network. Or we can even connect to it through an Internet web browser. So, as we step through this lesson, we're going to step through how to install and configure a local print device, how to connect to a network print device, and how to connect to a network print device using a web browser. But do keep in mind that a print device has to have that print driver in order for us to successfully communicate and get the right document printed out the proper way. So with that, let's go ahead and get started.

Managing Windows Services
Hello and welcome to Pluralsight, you're watching Managing Windows Services. When you think about windows, you may want to actually think of it as a big puzzle and this big puzzle has different pieces that all connect together. And once it does, it allows us to be able to perform all the different tasks. Now, think about printing. In a previous lesson, we covered printing. Well, there's actually service called the print spooler service and the print spooler service's job is to be able to allow printing to work. Without it, we can't print. But keep in mind that that's only one small piece of the puzzle of the entire operating system. So there are a lot of different services that help make up that entire puzzle that allow Windows to function properly. So in this particular lesson, we're not only going to learn about some of the services are. We're going to talk about what dependencies are and we're going to talk about how we can configure recovery and we're also going to talk about how we can set up recovery. So that if a service fails, we can do something about it. Maybe we can restart the service or in some cases, restart the entire computer. So with that, let's get started.

Native Applications and Tools
Hello and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Native Applications and Tools. There are many different tools and applications that are built into Windows. Some are very simple and basic like a calculator, others help us to be able to search the Internet safely, and even others help us to be able to record shows and watch videos. So in this lesson, we're going to look at a lot of the different tools and applications that are built into Windows and how we can actually use some of those tools in our everyday life. So with that, let's get started.

Managing Applications
Hello and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Managing Applications. So there are many applications and tools that are built into Windows. But what about the applications that aren't part of Windows? They're not part of the default operating system, so how, what do I do to manage or even install those applications? Well that's where this section comes in. In this lesson, we're going to look at how we can not only install applications locally on our computer, but also some of the different application types that are available, like virtual applications or web-based applications. And there's even applications that can run off the server. We also going to look at how we can manage applications using programs and features, which is part of our Control Panel. So we do have a lot to look at inside of this lesson. So let's get started.

Virtual PC and Windows XP Mode
Hello and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Virtual PC and Windows XP Mode. Well, we've talked about applications in a couple of the previous lessons. And once again, there are just some applications that are not going to be compatible with Windows 7. So, how do I get those to run in my environment, which could be simply a home environment? Well, that's where the Windows XP Mode comes in. Windows XP Mode is actually a virtual Windows XP computer and it runs inside of Virtual PC, which we can actually had, use as a way to install other operating systems as well. This is a great combination that allows us to be able to do not only backward compatibility, but also have that test lab that we're looking for so that we can practice, we can get familiar with things, and we can crash things and then try to figure out why. So there's a lot of good information we're going to look as we go through this lesson. So let's go ahead and get started.