Windows Operating System Fundamentals: Managing and Maintaining

Most home and businesses use Microsoft Operating Systems as their primary operating system for both workstations and servers. It is important to know how to secure, manage, maintain, and protect your workstations.
Course info
Rating
(119)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 7, 2014
Duration
8h 41m
Table of contents
Introduction to Networking
Assigning IP Addresses
Local User and Group Management
Storage Devices
Files, Folders, and File Systems
File and Print Sharing Basics
NTFS Permissions
Remote Management and Assistance
Maintaining and Updating
Protecting Windows 7
Understanding Windows Backup
Recovery Methods
Description
Course info
Rating
(119)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 7, 2014
Duration
8h 41m
Description

More and more computers have become a part of our everyday life. We use them at work, home, and school. Most home and businesses use Microsoft Operating Systems as their primary operating system for both workstations and servers. It is important to have a basic foundation of how to protect, secure, manage, recover, and maintain Windows whether you are new to the IT field or just looking to learn the basics for your home computer. This course is designed to start the foundation with Microsoft Windows desktop operating system by learning solid skills in managing Windows and to build your IT future upon.

About the author
About the author

Ken has over 30 years of IT experience. In his career he has worked as a NetWare Admin, Windows Admin, Senior Support Engineer, Trainer, and Consultant.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction to Networking
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching an Introduction to Networking. Networking is one of the most common things that we have, not only in a corporate environment, but also at a home environment. Think about how many homes are connected to the internet today. And even though we may only have one computer that's connected to the internet, we're still part of a network. So in this section we're going to talk about what a network is, we're going to look at some of the different network components that we can set up, and in some cases configure. We're going to talk about what some of the different packet types are and what TCP/IP is. We're also going to take a quick look at TCP/IP addressing. There's so much more for us to learn and this is just going to be the tip of the iceberg. So there's a lot for us to cover, so let's go ahead and get started.

Assigning IP Addresses
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Assigning IP Addresses. Well, every device that's going to connect to our network is going to require an IP address. It doesn't matter if it's a printer, a laptop, maybe it's a tablet or a desktop, it could even be a router. All of our devices, though, have to have an IP address in order for us to be able to communicate with those devices. So in this section we're going to look at the different ways that we can assign IP addresses. There's the way where you manually go around to every single machine and have to enter it in or we can use a service to help assign the IP address. There's also some different commands that we can use to test connectivity, verify configuration, and in some cases just find out how did we get from point A to point B. So there's a lot of cool things that we're going to take a look at inside of this section. So with that, let's go ahead and get started.

Local User and Group Management
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Local User and Group Management. Well, even if we just do a default installation of Windows 7, we still have a user account that's going to be created, and we're going to use that user account as a way to login to our system. We can create additional users so that each person that's going to use our computer can have a different user account and with that user account a different user profile. By having a different user profile, each user can save their own backgrounds, their own screensavers, their own desktop icons, everything that they want to personalize can be saved just for them. Now group management is a way for us to take a collection of users that have a similar need and be able to group them together, which simplifies administration. So in this lesson, we're going to look at how we can create additional user accounts so that we can have each user that's going to use a computer have a different account, and that way they can save their own settings, they can do their own personalization. And we're also going to look at how we can manage groups of users, but only if we're using certain editions of Windows 7. We're also going to talk about what a user profile is. The user profile is simply how we get to save all of our settings, how we get to personalize and save our settings so that every time we log into the system, everything is still there. So, we've got a lot to look at in this particular lesson, so let's get started.

Storage Devices
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Storage Devices. Well, realistically, every computer has some kind of storage device, so as we go through this lesson we're going to look at some of the different disk configurations. We have both the basic disk and dynamic disk, and we're going to talk about what some of the differences are and what some of the benefits are. We're also going to look at some of the partition styles, like, what is MBR and what is GUID. There are some advantages of using one over the other, especially if we have a really large hard drive, say, something over like the 2 TB range. There are some options here that are going to be better than others. So as we go through this particular lesson, we're going to talk about what some of the different storage devices are and what some of the different configuration options are for our different storage devices. So with that, let's get started.

Files, Folders, and File Systems
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Files, Folders, and File Systems. So in an earlier lesson we talked a little bit about disks and partitions and being able to set up our disks, basically, so that we can store files and folders. Well, before we can start to store files and folders, we have to choose a file system and Windows supports, well, basically two file systems, FAT and NTFS. There are some really good benefits of using NTFS and it is the recommended file system that we use. However, FAT is still available and it actually works really well, especially on our USB flash drives or some kind of external devices that we might have. So, yes we may actually have a combination of using both FAT and FAT32. But we also have files and folders, and this is our information. This is how we organize and store our actual data. So there's a lot for us to cover in this lesson, so let's go ahead and get started.

File and Print Sharing Basics
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Understanding File and Print Sharing. You know there's an old saying that everything you needed to learn you learned in kindergarten, and one of the most important things that we should have learned in kindergarten was sharing. How do we share with others? So in this lesson we're going to look at the most common things that we're going to share with others inside of our network. We're going to look at folder sharing, which is a way for people to access other files and folders within our system, as well as printer sharing, a way for people to be able to connect and print to different print devices. So keep in mind that sharing is the most common reason that we have a network to begin with. So do keep in mind that sharing is the most common reason that we actually have a network, that way we can all gain access to different resources that we have within our network while not having to duplicate everything everywhere. Imagine having to have the same file on 10 different machines or having to go out and buy 20 different printers for 20 different employees. It just doesn't make sense, especially think about the cost involved. There's going to be some people that would probably be left out, just simply because the resource cost does not justify having a printer for everyone. So we have a lot to cover in this lesson, so let's go ahead and get started.

NTFS Permissions
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching NTFS Permissions. Well, if you think about all the different security breaches you've read about lately, permissions are very important, and in Windows, especially with an NTFS partition, we do have NTFS folder and file permissions, so we can configure permissions and the NTFS permissions are going to apply to anybody that sits locally at the workstation or anybody that connects across using, say, a Shared Drive or a Mapped Drive to that particular folder or file. I mean if you think about it, we can actually set up different permissions based upon a file or a folder, so that way we can customize them just the way we need them. So in this lesson we're actually going to look at not only what the NTFS permissions are, but we're going to look at the standard permissions, what the advanced permissions are, we're going to talk about permission inheritance and what effective permissions are. Then we're going to look at how permissions are set when we copy a file or when we move a file. So we do have a lot to get through in this lesson, so let's go ahead and get started.

Remote Management and Assistance
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Remote Management and Assistance. So imagine getting a phone call and somebody is needing help, but maybe they're just not close to where you happen to be. Well, that's where Remote Assistance can come in. Remote Assistance allows you to remotely connect to somebody else's computer and actually view what they see on their screen. And the good thing is you can do this in real time, meaning that you can see everything that they do. So you can help guide them through everything that they need to do to properly perform their tasks or to gather enough information that you can do some troubleshooting on their machine. Remote Desktop allows you to actually connect remotely to another computer, but this is as if you were actually sitting at that other computer. So you log in as you and you get your desktop, but the good thing is, we didn't have to travel anywhere. So in this lesson we're actually going to look at two different utilities or tools that we can use to help remotely connect to different computers. One provides help, one allows me to do configuration and management changes, all from sitting at my desk. So we have a lot to cover in this lesson, so let's get started.

Maintaining and Updating
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Maintaining and Updating. So we have our Windows 7 machine, it's up, it's running, we've got a good install, we've got all of our applications installed, we've got everything set up and running properly. Well, at least at the moment we do, right? But how do I go about maintaining my system? How do I go about updating it? Well, that's where this section comes in. There are several different tools or utilities that we can use inside of Windows to help us maintain a good, fresh, clean system, things like Disk Defragmenter and Disk Clean-up or how I can actually automate certain abilities or jobs by using the Task Scheduler. Of course, the Windows Updates is something that's going to help us maintain a healthy operating system by fixing some of the security flaws and adding some new features. So that's some of the topics that we're going to look at inside of this section. We actually have a lot to cover and a lot of this section is going to be lab based, so we get a lot of hands-on in this particular lesson, so let's go ahead and get started.

Protecting Windows 7
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Protecting Windows 7. Well, you've probably seen a lot of news lately over different data breaches. Target got hacked, Neiman Marcus got hacked, I mean, this is just an ongoing process. So when it comes to your system at home or at the office, we want to be able to protect our data. How can we actually make our computer safe or at least safer from everybody that's trying to get access to our information? And there are several different tools. Some are built-in to Windows 7 and some we can actually download free from Microsoft and set them up on our system. There's products like Windows Defender for spyware or malware detection, Windows Security Essentials or Forefront Endpoint Protection, which is anti-virus software. There's also the Malicious Software Removal Tool. We have the Windows Firewall, which is great for protecting us and trying to keep the bad guys out. And, of course, Windows Updates is going to help us protect our system by patching and fixing some of those security issues that might be there. So we have a lot to cover and this is another one of those lessons where we have a lot of lab time, so most of what we're going to cover here is going to be done through our labs. So let's go ahead and get started.

Understanding Windows Backup
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Understanding a Windows Backup. Now we pay for insurance for health, we pay it for auto, we pay it for our home, I mean, there's a lot of different areas that we can get insurance for. And the reason we have insurance is just in case, imagine that, just in case. So we pay a lot of money just in case something were to happen and our hope is that it never happens, right, that we never have to get into an auto accident or have a claim against our home insurance for maybe a broken pipe. I mean, honestly, I hope that never happens to you, but just in case it does, we have that insurance available to us, right? Well, with a Windows Backup it's the same way. We're protecting our files just in case. Maybe it's just in case a file gets deleted, maybe it's just in case an electronic component fails in our computer and we lose everything, maybe it's a hard drive that crashes or a motherboard or a lightning strike or something like that, but the purpose of the Windows Backup is to help protect our data just in case. So as we go through this particular lesson, we're going to look at not only how to do a regular system backup, but also how to do what's called a system image, which is a way for us to be able to put everything back the way it was, including the operating system in the event of, say, a hard disk failure. But not only do we need to know how to backup or how to understand how to backup our systems and what ways we can back it up, but we also need to know how to put it back. So we're going to not only look at the backup process, but also the restore process. We have a lot to cover in this lesson, so let's started.

Recovery Methods
Hello, and welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Recovery Methods. We can do everything right and still have our system fail at some point. And if our system fails, we have to know how we can, well, try to get it back up and running, right? So there are different recovery methods we can use, whether it's something simple like Safe Mode where it helps me go to a safe environment with very minimal services running, all the way to running a system restore where I actually put everything back from a backup environment. There's also what's called Last Known Good Configuration, which can allow me to go back to a previous state and all the registry settings that go with it. So that's what we're going to look at in this particular lesson are some of the different recovery methods and the recovery environment and how we can use them just in case our system does happen to die on us. So let's go ahead and get started.