Windows Server 2008 Active Directory (70-640) Part 2

This course is part 2 of 5 in the Windows Server 2008 Active Directory (70-640) series. This course will show you hands-on how to administer Active Directory using Windows Server 2008.
Course info
Rating
(107)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Nov 10, 2010
Duration
5h 1m
Table of contents
Configuring Access to Network Resources
Configuring Group Policy Objects
Working with Group Policy Exceptions
Configuring Group Policy Preferences
Using Group Policy for Software Deployment
Description
Course info
Rating
(107)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Nov 10, 2010
Duration
5h 1m
Description

This course is part 2 of 5 in the Windows Server 2008 Active Directory (70-640) series. This course will show you hands-on how to administer Active Directory using Windows Server 2008. You'll walk away from the course able to install and configure Active Directory, create and manage Active Directory and Group Policy objects, deploy software and manage permissions with Group Policy, create sites, and manage backup, replication, security and more. To get the most out of this course, you should have a solid foundation in networking. Some experience with Windows Server will be helpful, but is not required.

About the author
About the author

Ed Liberman has worked in technology for over 20 years. He has been certified and instructing IT since 1998. He has helped thousands of people to get started or advance their careers in the IT industry.

More from the author
More courses by Ed Liberman
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Configuring Group Policy Objects
Welcome to TrainSignal, you're watching a lesson on configuring Group Policy Objects. In this lesson, we'll see what's going on in the world of Globomantics and why we want to use Group Policy Objects. Then we'll see exactly what a GPO or a group policy object is. I'll show you how to use the group policy management console, or what sometimes is simply referred to as the GPMC. I also want to mention, by the way, that it is sometimes referred to as the GPMT, which is the group policy management tool. So if you see it referred to by either of those acronyms, it's the same utility. I'll show you how to create a GPO, I'll show you how to do something called link a GPO. We're going to talk about a term called LSDOu, which is a term that represents the order of application and inheritance of Group Policy Objects. And then we're going to go ahead and implement a policy and test it to see exactly what effect that policy had on a particular user or computer.

Working with Group Policy Exceptions
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson called Working With Group Policy Exceptions. Now in the last lesson we learned about group policy objects and the order of application. In this lesson we're going to go ahead and expand upon that and see exactly how to both configure your Active Directory infrastructure by creating an OU structure to support this GPO application, as well as how to alter the default LDSOU application processing order by using things like block inheritance, enforced and security filtering. I'll also go over a setting called loopback processing and introduce you to the gpupdate command.

Configuring Group Policy Preferences
Welcome to TrainSignal, you're watching a lesson on configuring Group Policy Preferences. Now this is going to be a short lesson in which we're going to check in briefly with Globomantics, then I'm going to talk to you about exactly what these Group Policy Preferences are. We're going to go right into the operating system, show you how to set up a couple of these Preferences, and then we'll test them and see how things work out. So checking with Globomantics, well basically, they've learned that group policy in Windows Server 2008 R2 has become much more flexible and powerful through the use of Preferences. So we're going to go ahead and take a look at some of these Preferences and see how Globomantics can put them to use.

Using Group Policy for Software Deployment
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on Using Group Policy for Software Deployment. In this lesson, we'll take a look at how software deployment through group policy can help out our Globomantics corporation. I'll go over the different software installation options that are available to you. I'll explain exactly what you need in order to install software using a GPO, and then we'll also talk about using group policy to maintain software. Now, Globomantics uses a wide range of applications to meet its business goals. They need a way to easily deploy these applications to workstations throughout their network without having to visit each one individually. Okay, so the first thing is by using group policy to deploy these applications, they won't have to go out and visit each of the individual computers. They would also like for these applications to be resilient and self-repairing in the event of corruption. You will see that when deploying with group policy, we have to use what's called Windows Installer Package files, and one of the benefits of using those Windows Installer Package files is that you have resilient, self-repairing applications. There also needs to be some control over which users and/or computers get which applications so we can avoid the needless clutter and overhead that comes from installing everything on every computer. So, as we've already seen with everything else in Group Policy, we go ahead and link the Group Policy that's going to deploy the software to a container that has the users and/or computers that need those applications.