Windows Server 2012 Installing and Configuring (70-410): Part 1

Part 1 of 3 in the Windows Server 2012 Installing and Configuring (70-410) series. This course centers on the installation and configuration of Windows Server 2012.
Course info
Rating
(1235)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 22, 2013
Duration
3h 55m
Table of contents
Welcome to Windows Server 2012 Installing and Configuring
Installing Windows Server 2012
Introduction to Windows PowerShell
Installing Active Directory Domain Services
User Account Management
Group Account Management
Computer Account Management
Working with Organizational Units (OUs)
Managing Active Directory Domain Services Using PowerShell
Description
Course info
Rating
(1235)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 22, 2013
Duration
3h 55m
Description

Part 1 of 3 in the Windows Server 2012 Installing and Configuring (70-410) series. This course centers on the installation and configuration of Windows Server 2012. There are upgraded features from older releases, like PowerShell which is quickly becoming a favorite over the command line tool. This is a course for those who have prior networking experience as well as those looking to take a step up from Server 2003, and 2008. This course may not provide complete coverage for the revised 70-410 exam. This course is scheduled for retirement once our complete new series for 70-410 is published. Please see http://blog.pluralsight.com/learning-path-installing-and-configuring-windows-server-2012-and-r2-70-410-exam for details.

About the author
About the author

Ed Liberman has worked in technology for over 20 years. He has been certified and instructing IT since 1998. He has helped thousands of people to get started or advance their careers in the IT industry.

More from the author
More courses by Ed Liberman
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Welcome to Windows Server 2012 Installing and Configuring
Well, hi there. My name's Ed Liberman, and I'd like to be the first to welcome you to my course here at TrainSignal on Windows Server 2012 Installing and Configuring. Now what I'd like to do before we get into the course itself is I want to give you a little bit of context about what this course is going to be all about. And really the title kind of says it all, it's Installing and Configuring. So this is one of the first Windows Server 2012 courses you should be taking, and in this course, there's going to be a lot of how to. In other words, there's going to be all these different technologies and we're going to learn how to install them, learn how to configure them. In later courses, I will encourage you to go ahead and learn more of the Enterprise design type environment of these technologies, but before you can design something, you have to know how to implement it. So that's what we're going to do here, we're going to learn how to do some stuff. So, now that we've established some context and what we're going to be doing here in the course, I'd really like to invite you to sit back, relax, and let's enjoy learning a little bit about Windows Server 2012. I'm going to see you in the next lesson.

Installing Windows Server 2012
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on Installing Windows Server 2012. And in this lesson-- you're going to like this-- I want to just take you right in and start showing you how to install it, rather than boring you with a whole lot of talk about it. But there is one thing I need to talk to you about first, and that is the Minimum Hardware Requirements. And that's pretty much just because if you want to follow along with me as I do it, well, you're going to have to have a computer that meets these requirements. So real quick, there's three main things you've got to make sure that you have. First of all, the computer has to have a processor that's at least 1. 4 GHz, you have to have at least half a gigabyte or 512 MB of memory or RAM, and you have to have at least 32 GB of available hard disk space. And that's pretty much it. I mean, yeah, you have to have a monitor or you won't be able to see anything, and keyboard and mouse, and maybe a DVD drive if you're going to install off the DVD, okay, so you have to have some of those basics, but as far as the actual resource requirements, that's it. 1. 4 GHz processor, half a gigabyte of RAM, and 32 GB of hard drive space. And if you think about it, you have to go back quite a few years to find a computer that doesn't meet those minimum requirements, and that's one of the cool things about Windows Server 2012. So now that you know that, let's go ahead and see how it's done.

Introduction to Windows PowerShell
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching an Introduction to Windows PowerShell. And in this lesson, I will tell you, it's just that. It's an introduction into what exactly PowerShell is. So I will tell you, before we go take a look at it, PowerShell is something that is fairly new; it's not completely new, we're now on PowerShell 3. 0, but it's something that the entire Windows Server 2012 operating system is built around. And we are going to see PowerShell throughout the operating system. As I'm showing you different features, we're going to see how it relates to PowerShell and how we can do things with PowerShell. Now that said, I will also tell you that PowerShell can be thought of as kind of, well, not the most technically accurate, but it's almost like the new Command Prompt. Some people look at it that way, meaning it's a command line interface and it can be used as a scripting engine, that's one of the really nice features about it. But if you have experience with prior versions of Windows Server operating systems, you know that in certain cases, you could do one thing through scripting, you know, we'll say through either a certain scripting language or through the command line, and you would do things slightly different or you might have different capabilities if you were doing it through the GUI. Whereas now the entire GUI, or Graphical User Interface, so everything that we point and click, has been built on top of this PowerShell, which means whether you want to do it from a command line or script or whether you do it through the GUI with a mouse, it's all the same functionality, and that's pretty cool. So with that, let's go ahead and actually see a little bit about what this PowerShell looks like.

Installing Active Directory Domain Services
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on Installing Active Directory Domain Services. And when it comes to installing Active Directory Domain Services, there's really no better way to teach you how it's done than to just show you how to do it. So, let's go take a look, see how it's done.

User Account Management
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on User Account Management, where we're going to go ahead and look at everything there is about user accounts in Active Directory Domain Services, from creating them, to managing them. So what is a User Account, exactly? Well, a user account is an object-- okay, we're going to learn that everything in Active Directory Domain Services is an object-- which controls the authentication and access-- and I will tell you very often it's referred to as identity and access, that's a very common term, but a lot of people don't fully understand it, so authentication seems to ring a bell. When you authenticate an individual user, you're validating who they are, or quite frankly, their identity, right? So that's why they call it identity. . . . and access to resources, and can contain many attributes about this user on your network. Or to put it in real short, simple layman's terms, a user account is an object in Active Directory that represents a specific actual user, or actual person, who is going to be accessing stuff on your network. Now before we go in and look at managing these user accounts, let's first take a look at the different management tools that are available in Active Directory Domain Services.

Group Account Management
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on Group Account Management. Now in another lesson, we talked about User Account Management. Well, we're now going to take this to a whole new level by looking at how to manage group objects within the Active Directory Domain Services environment.

Computer Account Management
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on Computer Account Management. Now in other lessons, we've learned about other Active Directory Domain Services objects, like User Accounts and Group Accounts. Well, here's another one, and this is just called Computer Accounts, and we're going to see how exactly we work with them in Active Directory Domain Services.

Working with Organizational Units (OUs)
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on Working with Organizational Units, or what's sometimes just referred to as the letters OU for short. Cause let's be real, Organizational Unit, that's a mouthful. So anyway, I will tell you that in other lessons, we've learned about all sorts of different Active Directory objects, like users and groups and computers. Well, now we're going to see how to kind of bring that all together and be organized with our OUs.

Managing Active Directory Domain Services Using PowerShell
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on Managing Active Directory Domain Services Using Windows PowerShell. Now speaking of Windows PowerShell, that's a name that has come up in other lessons, and you will continue to hear it come up again and again in many other lessons, and the reason is because everything in Windows Server 2012 is in some way, shape, or form tied into Windows PowerShell. As a matter of fact, in order for you to become a PowerShell expert, you're probably going to have to learn that as a whole separate subject. As a matter of fact, I know we have a course or two here just on Windows PowerShell. So, I'm not expecting you by the end of this lesson to be an absolute PowerShell expert. It is something that I do encourage you to go out there and achieve; I think everybody should learn about Windows PowerShell. But what I want to do with you in this lesson is just specifically go through the PowerShell commands, or as we'll learn, they're actually called commandlets, but the different commandlets that you would use to specifically perform certain functions within Active Directory Domain Services.