Windows Server 2012 Installing and Configuring (70-410): Part 2

Part 2 of 3 in the Windows Server 2012 Installing and Configuring (70-410) series. This course centers on the installation and configuration of Windows Server 2012.
Course info
Rating
(439)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 22, 2013
Duration
3h 30m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(439)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 22, 2013
Duration
3h 30m
Description

Part 2 of 3 in the Windows Server 2012 Installing and Configuring (70-410) series. This course centers on the installation and configuration of Windows Server 2012. There are upgraded features from older releases, like PowerShell which is quickly becoming a favorite over the command line tool. This is a course for those who have prior networking experience as well as those looking to take a step up from Server 2003, and 2008. This course may not provide complete coverage for the revised 70-410 exam. This course is scheduled for retirement once our complete new series for 70-410 is published. Please see http://blog.pluralsight.com/learning-path-installing-and-configuring-windows-server-2012-and-r2-70-410-exam for details.

About the author
About the author

Ed Liberman has worked in technology for over 20 years. He has been certified and instructing IT since 1998. He has helped thousands of people to get started or advance their careers in the IT industry.

More from the author
More courses by Ed Liberman
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Implementing IPv4
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on implementing IP version 4. In this lesson I'm going to show you all the different ways to, well, implement IP version 4. In other words, there are a few different ways that you can go in and assign an IP address to a server and we'll see that it's more than just an IP address, but I'm going to show you the different ways to do it. So let's go ahead and get started.

Implementing IPv6
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on implementing IPv6. Now in this lesson we're going to focus on the implementation of IPv6. I know that might sound redundant or obvious because, you know, that's the name of the lesson, but here's the thing, when IPv6 first came out most of the material that's out there had everything to do with what an IPv6 address looked like, how you make it up, how you work with it, and all that fun stuff, and I have those lessons out there. As a matter of fact if you go to my TCP/IP and Networking Fundamentals lessons I cover that. And if you don't know what an IPv6 address looks like, I insist stop this lesson right here, go watch that one. But now that we know, for the most part, you know, there's been a lot of material out there, what an IPv6 address looks like and you know how it's made up, what I want to talk to you about in this lesson is going to have do with the actual migration from IPv4 into IPv6. Okay because everything up to this point has been IPv4 pretty much. Okay so you're going to have to know when you implement IPv6 how to make it coexist with IPv4 and how to get that migration from one to the other. So let's go learn about that now.

Implementing DHCP
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on implementing DHCP. Now before we go in and learn all about how DHCP works and how to implement it in Windows Server 2012, let's first talk about what exactly DHCP is and why we need it. So the first thing in want to tell you is that those letters, D-H-C-P, they stand for the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. And if I want to be a little bit more sophisticated about it I would say that the idea is that we take our host, right I'm going to take all the letters here, you'll see how this plays together, we take our hosts or our computers and we dynamically configure their protocol or to be specific, their TCP/IP protocol. Okay great. So now we've taken some letters, we've put some words in it, and we tried to tie them together. How about I give you a real easy way of understanding DHCP. We automatically assign IP addresses. Right, instead of walking around to all the different computers on our network and statically typing in those IP addresses, DHCP allows for us to automatically have those IP addresses handed out. Now as we'll learn it's more than just the IP address and that's why I say it's more about the TCP/IP protocol as a whole, but again, to keep it simple, and I want you to keep it simple if you're just learning this for the first time, it's just automatically assigning IP addresses. So let's go take a look at how it works.

Implementing DNS
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on implementing DNS. Now I'm going to tell you, just real short and to the point, when it comes to DNS there's a lot to know and this lesson is going to be a doozy. So if you're feeling a little sleepy right now go ahead and hit pause right now, go get some caffeine, because we're going to be here for a little while. Okay this is most likely the longest lesson in this entire course and the reason is because DNS has such an importance in a Windows Server 2012 network environment. So I'm going to leave it as simple as that and say, let's get going, let's go learn about DNS.

Implementing Local Storage
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on implementing local storage. Now when it comes to storage as a whole, there's a number of different solutions that are available. We hear about all sorts of different things like network attached storage or NAS or storage area networks, right, SANs, okay and there's all sorts of different even, you know, data storage as a service these days. You know, we have outsourced data warehouseing, you name it, there's a lot of different storage solutions. I mean the Cloud, right, that's a big term right now. What we're going to talk about in this lesson is local storage, meaning storage that is specifically local to the individual servers that you're working with. Alright so that's where our focuses will be and then keep in mind as you grow into the enterprise there are bigger and better storage solutions also available. Let's go take a look.

Implementing File Services
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on implementing file services. Now when we say implementing file services, what do we mean by that? Well I mean basically making data available, right, I mean that's really what it's all about when you think about it, when it comes down to computer networking, it's about making resources, you know, that are stored in a central location available to all of our clients or we could say all of the workers, right, in our company. And so implementation of file services has to do with making files and folders, you know, that's one of those resources, making them available to our employees. So in this lesson we're going to go ahead and see how we would do that. So let's go learn about it now.

Implementing Print Services
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on implementing print services. Now similar to another lesson that we did on implementing file services, I will tell you that when it comes to print services, things have not changed a whole lot if you've worked with prior server environments. But there are some interface changes. So we're going to go ahead and just jump right in, this is a fairly short and to the point lesson where we're going to see how to make, well to put it quite frankly, printing work in Windows Server 2012. Let's go take a look.