Building a Cisco VCS Control Dial Plan and Expressway Remote Access Solution

Firewall traversal, secure remote access, and video endpoint registration are essential components in a multi-site Unified Collaboration deployment. This course will teach you how to configure Cisco VCS Control and VCS Expressway servers.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 3, 2018
Duration
2h 12m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 3, 2018
Duration
2h 12m
Description

In today’s fast-paced world, the ability to communicate using real-time IP voice and video technology is a business necessity. In this course, Building a Cisco VCS Control Dial Plan and Expressway Remote Access Solution, you will learn the step by step process of registering SIP endpoints using a TelePresence VCS Control solution, as well as learn how to configure VCS Expressway to provide firewall traversal and secure remote access that doesn’t require a VPN. First, you will learn how to do the initial configuration of a Cisco VCS Control server and use TelePresence Management Server (TMS) to register users and SIP endpoints. Next, you will see how to configure Cisco Unified Communications Manager and Cisco VCS Control to communicate using SIP trunks, and configure Cisco VCS Expressway to provide edge services such as firewall traversal, business to business communications, and secure remote access. Then, you will explore how to configure DNS servers to support Jabber registration through the corporate firewall using Expressway-Edge and Core servers. Finally, you will review how to troubleshoot a variety of common “real world” configuration issues that can come up when building the features covered in this course. When you’re finished with this course, you’ll have the skills and knowledge needed to configure Cisco VCS Control and Expressway servers.

About the author
About the author

Sean Douglas has more than 17 years of experience working extensively with Cisco technology. He is a Cisco Systems Engineer that consults with a variety of clients to design, implement, and maintain their Cisco Collaboration solutions. Sean is CCNP in Routing and Switching, Wireless, and Collaboration.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Sean Douglas, and I want to welcome you to my course, Building a Cisco VCS Control Dial Plan and Expressway Remote Access Solution. I've been a Cisco engineer and instructor for nearly two decades, and in that time, I've taught thousands of adults a lot about Cisco including IP networking, voice and video collaboration, and especially how to make their Cisco technology work for them. This course, which is part of an ongoing series, is designed to make sure that you understand exactly how to implement a Cisco VCS Control and VCS Expressway solution, how to configure it, and how to troubleshoot it. This course will absolutely give you real-world solutions. We're going to show you how to configure Cisco TelePresence VCS, and we're going to do it in a way that's easy to understand. We're going to use extensive demonstrations, hands-on step-by-step configuration examples so that you'll be able to configure, deploy, and troubleshoot your Cisco VCS solution. There are a lot of different parts and pieces that work together to configure Cisco VCS, and this course will make sure that you understand them all. By the end of this course, you'll be able to configure and administer a variety of Cisco VCS solutions, as well as be able to create secure remote access for Jabber users and troubleshoot a variety of common collaboration issues. We've designed this course to have extensive hands-on examples so that you'll be able to reference our step-by-step demonstrations in your day-to-day career. Before beginning this course, you should have a basic understanding of Cisco Unified Communications Manager, either by having watched the previous courses, building a Cisco SIP URI-based dial plan with ILS, SME, and Unified Mobility, configuring a Cisco SRST and Enhanced Call Admission Control solution, and creating a Cisco plus E. 164 dial plan for multi-site deployments, or being at about the CCNA collaboration level, or have some experience working with Cisco Unified Communications Manager. I hope you'll join us as we create solutions in the Building Cisco VCS Control Dial Plan and Expressway Remote Access Solution course, at Pluralsight.

Configuring a Cisco VCS Dial Plan to Interconnect with CUCM
Hi everyone. I'm Sean Douglas, and welcome to the module, Configuring the Cisco VCS Dial Plan to Interconnect with Cisco Unified Communications Manager. In the previous module, we demonstrated how to configure Cisco VCS to support SIP endpoints, but now we're going to kick it up a notch and go to the next level. We're going to show you how we can expand our Collaboration Dial Plan to include Unified Communications Manager. We're going to set up a SIP trunk so the devices that are registered to Cisco VCS server, our video endpoints, can communicate with all the devices that are registered to our Unified Communications Manager. Our goals for this module are going to be to demonstrate for you how to configure more advanced features and implement policy with the Cisco VCS Control server. We're going to show you how to create zones. When an endpoint registers to Cisco VCS, it has to be put into a zone. So we're going to show you how we can create subzones, and then membership policy, so that when endpoints register, they'll go right into the zone you want them to go in. Once they're in the zone, you can manage how much bandwidth is allowed within the zone, and how much bandwidth is allowed between that zone and other zones. We're going to show you how to create transforms. These allow administrators to simplify the Dial Plan so that it's easier for our end users to make calls. We're going to show you how to connect devices registered to the VCS server to devices registered to Unified Communications Manager server using a SIP trunk. That way, all of our endpoints are going to be able to communicate so we have a true collaboration network. Then we're going to show you how to implement policy so that you can manage bandwidth between the two different systems. And then finally, we're going to show you how to implement call policy so that you can have the number one word of any collaboration administrator, predictability. You're going to be able to determine which endpoint is able to call which other endpoint based on your policy.

Configuring Mobile and Remote Access on Cisco Expressway Series
The Cisco Jabber software client is really convenient. Instead of having to have your extension associated to an office phone that's physical plugged into the corporate network, you can instead have it associated with a Jabber app that can run on your PC, your phone, your tablet. The problem is when you go home, or are anywhere outside of the main network. You've got to let your Jabber client back in through the firewall, and that could give the security team nightmares. Hi everyone. I'm Sean Douglas, and welcome to the module Configuring Mobile and Remote Access on Cisco Expressway Series. In this module, we're going to use the Cisco Expressway Edge and Core to help the security team and make it a lot easier for our collaboration to end users to connect securely from anywhere without needing a VPN. Our goals for this module are going to be to demonstrate the step-by-step process of configuring a mobile and remote access solution using Cisco Expressway. If we're going to create a secure connection between our Expressway-C and E servers, we're going to need certificates. So in this module, we're going to show you the step-by-step process to create and then apply those certificates. Once we've got our certificates in place, we're going to configure a traversal zone, which will allow a secure connection between the Expressway-E server out there on the internet, and the Expressway-C server sitting nice and pretty on our internal network. We'll have that traversal zone that goes through the firewall and the end result is that our Jabber clients out on the internet are going to be able to connect securely through the firewall using the Expressway-E and C servers. We're going to have a secure and scalable remote access solution.

Configuring Cisco Jabber to Register via Expressway
As someone who travels a lot, and also works from home at times, being able to connect remotely is a crucial component, and it's something that we, as collaboration administrators, need to provide our end users. We've demonstrated in previous modules how to configure the Cisco Expressway-E and C server. We've configured a traversal zone. This allows Jabber clients from anywhere out there on the internet the ability to connect and register to our internal Unified Communications Manager servers without needing a VPN. Hi everyone. I'm Sean Douglas, and welcome to the module, Configuring Cisco Jabber to Register via Expressway. In this module, we're going to demonstrate how to register Cisco Jabber clients, both internally by modifying our DNS records, as well as being able to connect externally using the Expressway-E and C server solution that we configured in the last module. Our goals for this module are going to be to demonstrate how to register Cisco Jabber clients, internally, inside of the organization, and externally, on the internet. We're going to demonstrate how to configure the DNS server so that it has the correct SRV records for both internal registration and external registration. And then finally, we're going to demonstrate that our traversal zone that we configured in the last module actually works. We're going to show you that the Jabber client can resolve the DNS name of our Expressway-E server, and from there, go right through the traversal zone, right through the firewall, and register to our internal Unified Communications Manager server, which then, of course, gives it the ability to send and receive calls to other endpoints. other phones, video units, etc.