PowerPoint 2010: Animations and Producing Your Presentation

Part 3 of 3 in the PowerPoint 2010 series. This course is your PowerPoint encyclopedia for just about any feature you could possibly want.
Course info
Rating
(13)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 13, 2011
Duration
3h 17m
Table of contents
Introduction to Object Linking and Embedding
Embedding and Linking Files
Adding Slide Transitions
Adjusting Transition Timing
Previewing Transitions
Creating Animations
Modifying an Animation
Reordering Animations
Saving Time with the Animation Painter
Displaying the Advanced Animation Timeline
Advanced Animations
Triggering Animations
Rehearsing Your Slide Show Presentation
Creating a Custom Show
Adjusting Slide Show Options
Presentation Keyboard Shortcuts
Preparing Speaker Notes
Preparing Audience Handouts
Advanced Printing Options
Exporting to Microsoft Word
Sending a PowerPoint Presentation via Email
Saving a PowerPoint File to the Web
Creating a PDF
Creating a Video
Broadcasting a Slide Show over the Internet
Packaging a Presentation for a CD
Introduction to Templates
Creating Template Masters
Saving a Presentation as a Template
Next Steps
Description
Course info
Rating
(13)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 13, 2011
Duration
3h 17m
Description

Part 3 of 3 in the PowerPoint 2010 series. Don't use PowerPoint that often? Well, you've probably forgotten how to do some stuff then. This course is your PowerPoint encyclopedia for just about any feature you could possibly want. Animations. YouTube videos. Charts. Transitions. Pictures. SmartArt. Tables and Spreadsheets. You name it, it's here. Feel free to skip around the course and watch the topics you are interested in. Oh, and for all of you ADHD learners, each clip is extra super short. I promise.

About the author
About the author

Heather Ackmann is an accomplished instructor with a decade of teaching experience, helping students at the high school, college, and adult levels in a variety of topics. Specializing in Microsoft Office computer applications, she is a Microsoft Office Certified Master and holds a degree in English and Secondary Education.

More from the author
End-user Communications for Better IT
Beginner
2h 37m
May 17, 2017
Word 2016 for Power Users
Beginner
2h 23m
Dec 21, 2016
Microsoft Word (2016): Essentials
Beginner
1h 32m
May 4, 2016
More courses by Heather Ackmann
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Embedding and Linking Files
You're watching the lesson titled Embedding and Linking Files. When PowerPoint users refer to inserting an object, they're typically referring to embedding or linking a file created from another program. Now, if you haven't already, be sure to watch the lesson titled Introduction to Object Linking and Embedding for more background on this topic. But in this lesson, however, we're going to dive in and learn how to embed a file into PowerPoint, how to link a file, and how to break a link. So, let's get started. Embedding Files.

Adding Slide Transitions
You're watching a lesson titled Adding Slide Transitions. This lesson will begin with a brief introduction to transitions. And then we'll jump right into PowerPoint and learn how to apply a transition to a slide. Afterwards, we'll play around with some of the different effect options so you can customize how a slide transitions into another. So, let's get started. Introduction to Transitions. A slide transition refers to how one slide switches to the next slide in a slide deck. It's similar to animations, only it's an animation that is applied to the entire slide, rather than elements on a slide. So with that said, a transition occurs between slides. And with the release of PowerPoint 2010, slide transitions got a huge overhaul, making them more realistic and three-dimensional. There's Fade, Wipe, Gallery, Vortex, just kind of a fancy one, Ripple, and many others. Now, just don't go crazy with your slide transitions. Just like with Clip Art, slide transitions can be a distraction to your overall message, so it's best to pick one transition that fits with the tone of your presentation and stick with that one transition. When in doubt, Fade is a very simple and classic transition to use. So, don't feel that you have to use every transition just because it's there.

Creating Animations
You're watching a lesson titled Creating Animations. In this lesson, we'll begin with a brief introduction to Creating Animations in PowerPoint 2010. And then we'll learn how to animate Bullet and Numbered Lists, Shapes, Smart Art, and even Charts. So there's a lot to do. So let's get started. Introduction to PowerPoint Animations. PowerPoint 2010 gives you the ability to create four basic kinds of animations. You can create entrance effects to determine how an object will first appear on the slide. You can also create emphasis effects, which will animate an object already appearing on the slide. Exit effects will determine how an object will disappear from a slide. And finally, you can create Motion Paths, which will move an object around on a slide. And you can combine any of the above animation effects to achieve a variety of different looks.

Sending a PowerPoint Presentation via Email
You're watching the lesson titled Sending a PowerPoint Presentation via Email. In this lesson, we're going to learn about all the different ways that you can send a PowerPoint presentation via email. We're going to learn how to send a presentation as an email attachment, how to send a link to a shared presentation on a network drive or Internet location such as SkyDrive. We're going to learn how to send a PowerPoint presentation as a PDF or XPS. And then we're going to learn about all the different Internet fax services that you can use to send a presentation via Internet fax. So, there's a lot to talk about, so let's get started. With PowerPoint 2010, you have a variety of ways to package your presentation for email delivery. You can attach the PowerPoint file directly to an email without even leaving PowerPoint. Or you can send a link of your presentation in that email. Or you can attach a copy, or a PDF, or XPS copy of your presentation. Or you can even send your presentation by way of Internet fax, assuming you use an Internet fax service provider.

Creating Template Masters
You're watching the lesson titled, Creating Template Masters. So, the title of this lesson is a bit misleading as there's no such thing as a Template Master. There is something, however, called Slide Masters, which you design, customize, and set up before you go about creating a template. So, in this lesson, what I mean by that title, is we're going to be learning how to design and prepare a template by learning how to customize something called Slide Masters. In other words, we're not creating a template just yet, but we're getting ready to. And that is the focus of this particular lesson. To start, we'll begin with a brief introduction to Slide Masters and then learn how to view Slide Masters in any PowerPoint presentation. Next, we'll learn how to create new layouts, additional Masters and Placeholders, and finally how to stylize those Masters to create a new template design. Now, there's a lot of ground to cover, so let's get started. Introduction to Slide Masters.