Meteor.js Fundamentals for Single Page Applications

In this course, you'll learn about the Meteor platform and how to create a single page application using it.
Course info
Rating
(325)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 1, 2013
Duration
2h 52m
Table of contents
Introduction
Understanding Meteor
Creating Our App
Extending Our App
Beyond Meteor
Description
Course info
Rating
(325)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 1, 2013
Duration
2h 52m
Description

Meteor is an exciting web development platform that has the potential to change the way you develop single page web applications. Unfortunately, since Meteor is so new, there isn’t a large amount of information available to learn how to develop applications with it. This course is designed to take you through the full process of developing a complete single page application in Meteor using JavaScript and deploying that application to a real production system. We’ll start off by learning about what Meteor is and learning about the technologies that Meteor uses. Then, we’ll dig deep into Meteor to demystify the “magic” around it and discover how Meteor is able to do so much with so little code. Then, we’ll actually create our first Meteor application and along the way we’ll cover some of the code concepts of Meteor needed to create a basic Meteor application. Once we have the basics down, we’ll expand our application and discover some of the more advanced concepts of the platform that really allows us to utilize the power of Meteor. Finally, we’ll go beyond Meteor as we learn how to deploy our application to both the Meteor servers and a Linux machine in the cloud and also discover how to use community created extensions to do things like add routing to our application. So, if you are interested in Meteor and want to see how you can create single page applications entirely in JavaScript with relatively little code, compared to other solutions, check out this course.

About the author
About the author

John Sonmez is the founder of Simple Programmer (http://simpleprogrammer.com), where he tirelessly pursues his vision of transforming complex issues into simple solutions

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight, and welcome to this course on Meteor Fundamentals for Single Page Applications. In this course, we'll be exploring the open source platform for building single page web applications, called Meteor. Meteor is still in the preview version at the time of recording this course, but it has the potential to make a big impact on the way we develop web applications, as you'll see in this course. When I first saw Meteor, I was very impressed by how easy it was to use, to create a real-time web application that didn't require me to think so much about the differences between the client and server. By the end of this course, you'll learn the basics of Meteor and how it works, and how to create a complete web application in Meteor, and how to deploy that application.

Understanding Meteor
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight, and in this module, we'll be diving a bit deeper into Meteor, as we learn exactly how Meteor works. Probably the biggest challenge you'll find in developing an application with Meteor is having enough faith in how Meteor works to be able to let go of some of the control you might be used to in developing an application and let Meteor do much of the hard work for you. We have to demystify a big portion of the magic of Meteor in order to understand how best to use it. In this module, we'll take a look at how exactly Meteor works. We'll start with the basics and talk about how Meteor actually manages to synchronize data almost seamlessly between different clients connected to the same application. We'll also look at the project structure of a Meteor application and take an in-depth look at Meteor in action, as we watch the data going back and forth, using the Chrome Developer Tools. By the end of this module, you should have a good understanding of how Meteor works and be ready to build an application using the technology.

Creating Our App
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight, and in this module we'll be creating our first real Meteor application. Now that we have a good understanding of what exactly Meteor is and how it works, it's time to build something with it. In this module, I'm going to take you through a step-by-step process of building a pretty simple Meteor application. And along the way, we'll learn about three important concepts in Meteor; templating, collections, and publishing. We'll learn how to apply each of these concepts as we use them to create our application. By the end of this module, you should be able to use these concepts to build your own simple Meteor application.

Extending Our App
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight and in this module we'll be extending our Protein Tracker app in Meteor to add some additional capabilities as we further our knowledge of the Meteor platform. So far, our app is pretty neat, but it isn't really that impressive. We can add protein and see the amounts updated in real time on multiple browsers, but we're missing the ability for a user to log into the application and we haven't really thought much about security. In this module, I'll take you through the process of building out our application with a bit more functionality and we'll hit on more of the key concepts in Meteor, like the built-in account support, Sessions, Computations, Latency support, and Meteor Server Methods. By the end of this module, you should have all the tools you need to build a real Meteor application and have a good idea of the capabilities the Meteor platform provides.

Beyond Meteor
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight and in this module we'll be going beyond the basics of building Meteor applications and learn how to deploy our application, as well as use community-created packages from Atmosphere. So far, we've created our application using the unofficial Windows version of Meteor and that has worked out well for us, but if you're doing some serious Meteor development, you'll probably want to use a supported platform, especially when you're ready to deploy it. In this module, we'll go through the process of deploying a Meteor app to both the Meteor Servers and to a remote Linux machine. I'll also show you how to get Meteor installed and running on a Mac, where we'll utilize Meteorite to get packages from the Atmosphere Repository that will allow us to add a very important addition to most Single Page Applications written in JavaScript, Routes. By the end of this module, you should know how to deploy a Meteor application and how to utilize packages from Atmosphere.