Introduction to 2D Game Programming with XNA

Learn how to create a basic 2D game using XNA.
Course info
Rating
(140)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 28, 2012
Duration
5h 22m
Table of contents
Introduction to XNA
2D Graphics
Input
Collisions
Animations
Sounds
Finishing
Publishing
Description
Course info
Rating
(140)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 28, 2012
Duration
5h 22m
Description

Game programming doesn't have to be difficult. If you've wanted to learn how to program simple games for Xbox, Windows or Windows Phone 7, but have been intimidated by the complexity, this course is for you! This course walks you through using the Microsoft XNA framework to build a simple 2D space shooting game, exploring numerous game programming concepts along the way. Topics explored include: creating and using 2D graphics, accepting input from keyboards, mice, game controllers and touch screens, working with sounds and animation and much more. The course concludes by demonstrating how to deploy the game to a real Xbox 360 console and various application marketplaces.

About the author
About the author

John Sonmez is the founder of Simple Programmer (http://simpleprogrammer.com), where he tirelessly pursues his vision of transforming complex issues into simple solutions

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction to XNA
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight, and welcome to this course on 2D game development with XNA. In this first module, we are going to talk about XNA, get XNA installed and learn a little bit about how XNA projects are structured and what we're going to in the rest of this course.

2D Graphics
Hi. This is John Sonmez from Pluralsight and in this module we're going to be looking at two dimensional graphics inside of XNA. We're going to see how we can create two dimensional graphics and how we can use those graphics inside of our game and draw them on the screen, and we'll also find out a little bit about the terminology used when talking about graphics in game development in general and see how to draw text which is actually a graphic in XNA on the screen so we can do things like create a score.

Input
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight. In this module, we're going to be talking about Input in XNA. So up to this point, when we've been developing our game, we've just created the graphics for the game. But we haven't been able to move those graphics. So what we're going to learn about in this module is how to actually take some input from the player and then use that input to control the graphics or the sprites in our game.

Collisions
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight. And in this module we're going to be learning about Collisions in XNA. So, so far we've been able to move our ship around but you may have noticed that we can fly right out of bounce and this isn't good. We need to be able to keep our game objects inside of our screen. So by using boundaries in Collisions in XNA, we'll be able to detect when a game object is about to leave the screen or when a game object is going to collide with another game object. And we're going to use that to enhance our game and to allow us to do things like build some enemies which we'll add to the game in this module and some shots that the enemy could fire or the player could fire at the enemy, and to detect when either the player is hit or the enemy is hit by the one of the shots.

Animations
Hi this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight and in this module we're going to be looking at how to create animations in XNA. Now, animations are definitely one of those things that can really add some polish to your games. And at this point we've got a pretty decent game in place with most of the mechanics of the game. But we're going to polish some things now by adding animations in this module and in the next module we'll see how to add some sound effects.

Sounds
Hi. This is John Somnez from Pluralsight, and in this module, we're going to be adding some sounds and some sound effects to our XNA game. So sounds are definitely a very important part of your game. You'll find that once you had sounds, it really brings your game to life. So this is really an important step to take and it's actually fairly easy to do, so it's definitely worth the time of adding some sounds and some sound effects to your game.

Finishing
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight. And in this module, we're going to see how we can finish up our space shooting games. So, so far, we've created most of the aspects of the actual game and the game play. We have our ship. It can shoot the enemy, the enemy can shoot. We can handle explosions and sound effects, but there're still a few things that we need to do to really make a real game out of this. Some of those things include creating a title screen, making some game state transitions. So, for example, when you get killed, you should go into game over screen which it should be able to pause the game. And then we can do some other things here like adding the ability to have lives that can be tracked. We could create some AI for the enemies. There's a lot of different things that we can add. So, we're going to add some of those elements, and then we're going to talk about some of the other things that you might want to add on your own later to really polish the game and how you might implement some of those things.

Publishing
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight. In this module we're going to be looking at how we can actually publish or get our game ready for publishing. So, up to this point we've gone over all of the aspects of creating a game and have pretty much a full game here. Now, we didn't odd all of the extra little features that you might add in a real game. So, if you're going to publish game you'd probably want to do a little bit more than this. But we have the basic structure. You could definitely publish a simple game from what we have so far. So, in this module we're going to learn how to basically take our game and see if we can deploy it to a Windows machine. We're going to see how to get it running on an Xbox which is going to be really neat. And then, we're going to see how to get our game ready for the Windows Phone 7 store. And we'll talk about some other areas that you could publish your game to even Android or iOS using another tool.