Making Java And C# Work Together: JVM and .NET CLR Interop

In this course we go over a few different ways to make your Java and .NET code talk to each other and even use Java code in .NET and vice-versa.
Course info
Rating
(87)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 17, 2013
Duration
2h 37m
Table of contents
Worlds Apart
Using Java Libraries From C#
Writing a .NET Application In Java
Bridging Between VMs
Using Services
Description
Course info
Rating
(87)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 17, 2013
Duration
2h 37m
Description

Are you plagued by the problem of trying to get some Java and C# code to work together? Do you have constant battles between the .NET side and the Java side, because of the competition between the two? Perhaps you just have to work in both environments and wish there was a way to reuse some of your code from Java in .NET or .NET code in Java? This course will give you solutions to help with all of those problems. In this course we'll take a look at how you can make your Java and .NET code talk by utilizing 3 different technologies. First, we'll use IKVM.NET to convert Java directly to .NET, which will allow you to use Java libraries in your .NET applications and even write Java applications in .NET. Then, we'll use JNBridgePro to bridge directly between .NET and Java and allow you to communicate between .NET and Java applications while still running each in their own environment. Finally, I'll introduce you to RabbitMQ for creating a message based service that allows for not only Java and .NET to interoperate, but also any other language that can send messages to RabbitMQ. So, if you've been considering rewrite a Java application as a .NET application or a .NET application as a Java application, but have been thinking there has to be a better way, this course might be just what you are looking for. Or if you are in an environment where both Java and .NET are used, but seldom talk to each other, this course can help you to learn about tools you can use to get both sides talking, letting you walk away a hero.

About the author
About the author

John Sonmez is the founder of Simple Programmer (http://simpleprogrammer.com), where he tirelessly pursues his vision of transforming complex issues into simple solutions

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Worlds Apart
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight, and welcome to this course on making Java and C# work together. There are many reasons why you may have decided to watch this course, but if I had to guess, I would say that you probably are facing the difficult task of taking two systems written in different languages with different tools and trying to make them talk. Don't worry, you are not alone. Many software developers and enterprises face the same problems you do. Unfortunately there isn't a lot of information out there to help you out. That's why I decided to make this course. So, stayed tuned and I'll show you how you can break down those language and virtual machine walls.

Using Java Libraries From C#
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight, and in this module we'll be learning how to use actual Java libraries from C#. If you are like me, when I first heard this was possible, you were probably a bit skeptical. The idea of being able to access Java code from C# seems too good to be true. Well, the technology we are going to use to do this isn't perfect, but it is pretty amazing what you can accomplish with it. Most Java code can be converted to. NET and used in a. NET application with very little effort as you'll see in this module.

Writing a .NET Application In Java
Hi. This is John Sonmez from Pluralsight and in this module we'll be flipping things around and learning how to write a. NET Application in Java using IKVM. Now, why would you even want to write a. NET Application in Java? Good question. There are several reasons, but usually the most common reason is because you're either more familiar with Java, but need to be able to write an application that will work in the. NET environment or because you have some Java code that already exists, but you need to make that code be able to utilize some. NET libraries. In this module we'll look at one of the most common cases of wanting to be able to access. NET code from Java and we'll see how to do it using the tool we covered in the last module, IKVM. NET. Things get a little trickier here, but this module should get you equipped with everything you need to know to get started writing a. NET Application in Java.

Bridging Between VMs
Hi, this is Jon Sonmez from Pluralsight, and in this module we'll be exploring a different option for making Java and. NET play together, using a bridge between VMs. So far, we have been using IKVM to convert Java bytecode to. NET IL, which allows us to use Java libraries and. NET and run Java application on the CLR. In this module we'll be using another technique that doesn't require us to convert any code from one platform to the other. We'll be using the concept of bridging, to bridge between the JVM and the CLR to allow code to communicate across this boundary.

Using Services
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight, and in this module we'll see how we can use services to communicate between. NET and Java. Up till this point, we've tried to communicate between. NET and Java by employing low-level techniques like translation and bridging. But in this module, we'll be looking at a more abstract way of communicating between the two platforms by using services and messaging. We'll be using the popular RabbitMQ software to handle our messaging, in this module. But the concepts we'll be talking about apply equally as well, to any other messaging framework.